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I could use a try catch scenario here, but I'm used to saying if x = 30 or if x > 100, but what I need to say is if x != int, but I am not allowed to use that statement.

What I need is a way to say, if the input by the user does not equal an integer then...

      Console.Write("Enter number of cats:"); //cats are 121.45

     var temp = Console.ReadLine();
     int cats;
     if (int.TryParse(temp, out cats))
   {

      price = (cats* 121.45);
   }
  else
 {
    Console.Write{"Number of cats must be an integer. Please enter an integer")
 }


      Console.Write ("Enter number of dogs"); //dogs are 113.35
      int product2 = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());
      price2 = (dogs * 113.35);
      Console.Write ("Enter number of mice:"); //mice are 23.45
      int mice = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());
      price3= (mice * 23.45);
      Console.Write("Enter number of turtles:"); //turtles are 65.00
      int turtles = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());
      price4 = (turtles * 65.00);
      Console.Write("Total price : $");
      grosssales = price1 + price2 + price3 + price4; //PRICE ONE IS NOT RECOGNIZED?
      Console.WriteLine(grosssales);
      Console.ReadKey();
    }
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closed as not a real question by WATTO Studios, LittleBobbyTables, Andrew Barber, Justin Boo, Binary Worrier Oct 18 '12 at 13:30

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What's the point of deleting your entire question and replacing it with nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn? –  LittleBobbyTables Oct 18 '12 at 13:31
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3 Answers

var temp = Console.ReadLine();
int cats;
if (int.TryParse(temp, out cats))
{
    // Yay, got the int.
}
else
{
    // Boooo, error.  Do something here to handle it.
}

.TryParse is your friend.

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You can use int.TryParse to establish if user input can be parsed as an int.

  var userInput = Console.ReadLine();     
  int cats;
  if(!int.TryParse(userInput, out cats))
  {
      //userInput could not be parsed as an int
  }
  else
  {
      //cats is good
  }
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I'm not a huge fan of if(!... Cleaner to invert the if statement. –  Johan Larsson Sep 27 '12 at 23:56
    
@JohanLarsson I usually end up doing things this way to reduce nesting (i.e. the bad case would most likely return or continue a loop) and then have no else. Of course, Dyjkstra wouldn't approve because using this style leads to multiple exit points. I don't really care though! –  spender Sep 27 '12 at 23:58
    
This does what I would like it to do, but the variable price becomes unrecognized in later parts of the code when it was recognized before replacing the code. –  user1513637 Sep 28 '12 at 0:09
1  
There's no price in my code, so we can only guess at your implementation. Why not update your question with more code? –  spender Sep 28 '12 at 0:12
    
@user1513637 If you declare price as an int then there is no reason for it not to become recognised later on. Is the variable still in scope at that stage? –  yu_ominae Sep 28 '12 at 0:15
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Use TryParse:

int cats;
if (Int32.Parse(Console.ReadLine(), out cats)) {
  price = cats * 239.99;
  // go on here
} else {
  Console.WriteLine("The number of cats must be an integer.");
}
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