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I am tossing up two ways of using variables in a method within a class. Some methods have up to 20 variables used. Which example is satisfy OOP progamming structures the best and why

**Example 1:**

$sampleclass->variable1 = 100;
$sampleclass->variable2 = 200;
$sampleclass->variable3 = 300;

$row = $sampleclass->Method();

--------------------------

class sampleclass {

  public function Method(){
    if ($this->variable1) {
         // do something
    }
     if ($this->variable2) {
         // do something
    }
     if ($this->variable3) {
         // do something
    }

  }
}



============================================

**Example 2:**

$row = $sampleclass->Method(100,200.300);


class sampleclass {

  public function Method($variable1, $variable2, $variable3){

  }
}
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closed as not constructive by John Conde, Surreal Dreams, Fabio, FelipeAls, martin clayton Sep 29 '12 at 13:13

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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

TL;DR : neither.


If you have 3 different executions based on 3 different conditions, then should have separate method for each of them. The resulting API should be something like something like:

$instance->someMethod( 100 );
$instance->differntMethod( 200 );
$instance->thirdMethod( 300 );
$result = $instance->produceResult();

The object are supposed to hold state. You have 3 different methods, which alter that state. And one method which returns data. No if statements required.

To learn a bit more about the subject, I would recommend you to watch this and this lecture.

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I like it... declare the variables Private within the class and set them using different methods so the data doesn't escape to the next method used –  danchar Sep 28 '12 at 1:22

The second way as it is more adherent to the Law of Demeter:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Law_of_Demeter

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Perhaps you should consider creating a method for each variable? That is if you need to do different things to all three values you can encapsulate each variable assignment.

for example:

class sampleclass 
{

  public function doSomethingWithA($value) 
  {
    $this->valueA = $value * 2;
  }

  public function doSomethingWithB($value) 
  {
    $this->valueB = $value * 3;
  }

  public function doSomethingWithC($value) 
  {
    $this->valueC = $value * 2;
  }

}
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If you have some desire to store those variables in the object, set up (private) data members for them. You should also define "getters" or mutator functions, or at the very least a constructor that takes the values you want for those data members. These functions will prevent the data from being set directly which gives you the opportunity to enforce rules about the values of the data and prevent them from being changed to inappropriate or inconsistent values.

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