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Say that I have a HTML that links to two scripts:

...
<script type="text/javascript" src="general.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="[pagename]_specific.js"></script>
...

Each of the two scripts has it's own jQuery's .ready() defined.

general.js:

jQuery(function() {
  var foo;
  $('#btn').click(function() {alert(foo())});
}

home_specific.js: an example of "[pagename]_specific.js"

jQuery(function() {
  foo = function() {alert("hello")};
}

where #btn is a button element.

"general.js" is a script that is shared by multiple pages, while each page has its dedicated "[pagename]_specific.js" for defining how the function assigned to foo behaves.

When I clicked on #btn I was expecting to see "hello" dialog, but instead, I got Uncaught TypeError: undefined is not a function in chrome developer tools. From this SO question, I understand that's because the two .ready() have two separate event handlers.

Question: Is there any way that the .ready() in "[pagename]_specific.js" appends to the event handler of the .ready() in "general.js", instead of defining another anonymous function?

share|improve this question
1  
If the application is yours, you can always make a global namespace window.foo. –  Fabrício Matté Sep 28 '12 at 0:43
    
@FabrícioMatté - Thanks but I would like to avoid polluting the global namespace, if possible. –  tamakisquare Sep 28 '12 at 0:48
1  
Yes, but there isn't much besides that. Two different scripts' functions don't have any common scope besides the global context. You'll need at least a var in the global context to store the namespace, or a common element which you can access the .data() to manipulate. –  Fabrício Matté Sep 28 '12 at 0:52
1  
Your problem has nothing to do with event handlers, it's all about variable scope. Variables declared inside one function are not accessible outside that function. –  Barmar Sep 28 '12 at 1:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

What is actually happening in your scripts is different than what you think.

In the following:

jQuery(function() {
  var foo;
  $('#btn').click(function() {alert(foo())});
}

you have created a local copy of foo by typing var in front of it. In this case foo is undefined.

In the following:

jQuery(function() {
  foo = function() {alert("hello")};
}

You have actually made globally accesible function called foo. But this will not execute until called. But in the first script, you try calling it. But what actually happens is your script try's using its own locally defined variable called foo, which is undefined.

The Following is what I would do

// general.js:
jQuery(function() {
  $('#btn').click(function() { 
    foo(); 
  });
});

// home_specific.js
var foo = function() {
  alert("hello");
};

Well I hope this has helped!! Hope you understand what's going on!

share|improve this answer
    
I was trying to avoid polluting the global namespace, but I guess that's the only option to achieve what I need. Thanks. –  tamakisquare Sep 28 '12 at 19:08

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