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I am having some problems on executing the following code.

  1. The code submits but it doesnt do anything, it comes back to the same screen, it seems that the values of the form have been not submited.

    <script type="text/javascript">
    $(document).ready(function(){
        $("#signin_form").validate({
              debug: false,
              rules: {
               ///
               },
               messages: {
               ///
               },
              submitHandler: function(form) { 
                  var result;
    
            $.post('test.php', $('#signin_form').serialize(),    function(data){
                result = $.parseJSON(data);
    
                if (result.flag == 'false'){
                    $('#results').show()
                }
            })
            .success(function(data){
                if (result.flag == 'true'){
                    form.submit();
                }
    
            }, 'json');
    
           }
       });
    });
    </script>
    
  2. If I change the code to the following, it works and it takes me to the proper screen, but i need to validate, a captcha code, i am not sure if it is the right place to do it, i tried to use beforeSubmit but then the captcha is not validated.

    <script type="text/javascript">
    $(document).ready(function(){
        $("#signin_form").validate({
              debug: false,
              rules: {
               ///
               },
               messages: {
               ///
               },
              submitHandler: function(form) { 
                  form.submit();
    
    
           }
       });
    });
    </script>
    

There is something about the $.post that i dont underestand... and doesnt submit the information.

Does anyone know what it could be? thanks!

share|improve this question
    
If you need to validate a captcha, you should do that with a remote validation method, you don't need to change how the form submits. I think there's an example of captcha on the plugin's documentation page. –  Barmar Sep 28 '12 at 1:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You don't need to change how the form submits, in this case, for validating the captcha, use remote function from jquery.validate.

There are some problems around the remote usage with jquery.validate. Check if you did the following:

1) Make sure you are using jQuery version 1.6.1 and above only.

2) Use the "synchronous" option for remote execution (default being asynchronous) and to do this set async argument to false.


Example of usage:

Suppose this is my form...

HTML:

Add id and name attributes to all the form elements or just the captcha (this one must have both).

<form id="signin_form" action="save.php" method="POST">
  Enter captcha: O1S2C3A4R
  <br/>
  <input type="text" id="captcha" name="captcha" value=""/>
  <input type="submit" id="save" name="save" value="Save"/>
</form>

jQuery:

Add type, async and data arguments. This last argument passes the captcha value to check.php file and that's why that element needs the id attribute. Then you are able to use this selector $('#captcha').

(For me this is better but you can also call the element by name using other selector type)

Just to know, you need to also define an error message for the remote, in this case I used Invalid captcha.

$(document).ready(function(){

    $("#signin_form").validate({
        rules: {
            captcha: {
                required: true,
                remote: { 
                    url:"check.php",
                    type:"post",
                    async:false,
                    data: {
                        /* this is the name of the post parameter that PHP will use: $_POST['captcha'] */
                        captcha: function() {
                            return $.trim($("#captcha").val());
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        },
        messages: {
            captcha: {
                required: "*",
                remote: "Invalid captcha"
            }
        }
    });

});

PHP: check.php

At this point it is important to use "true" or "false" as string to let know the jquery.validation plugin if the captcha is valid or not. In this case, if captcha is equals to O1S2C3A4R then is valid and, at client side, you will look that the submit will process the form to save.php file specified in the html form action attribute.

<?php

    $captcha = $_POST['captcha'];

    if($captcha == "O1S2C3A4R"){
        echo "true";
    } else {
        echo "false";
    }

?>

Doing this way, you can validate the whole form without problems and also check the captcha value remotely without altering plugin functionality.

Also you can test all this code together and look that it works :-)

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
hmmm... yeah this looks amazing, and sort of it works... the only problem is that it doesnt recognize that the response from check.php is true, and then it doesnt submit... in check.php i have if (!$resp->is_valid) { $response = 'false'; } else{ $response = 'true'; } echo json_encode($response); –  MariaZ Sep 28 '12 at 3:12
    
by the way Thanks soo much –  MariaZ Sep 28 '12 at 3:13
    
@MariaZ No problem, I am here to help :-) let me test something and I will update my answer –  Oscar Jara Sep 28 '12 at 4:05
    
Thanks!, this is giving me headache... thanks.. really –  MariaZ Sep 28 '12 at 4:17
    
@MariaZ LOL, check my edited post, it works now, I forgot to specify you some details :-) –  Oscar Jara Sep 28 '12 at 5:17

Javascript:

<script type="text/javascript">
    $(document).ready(function(){
        $("#signin_form").validate({
            rules: {
                captcha: {
                    remote: {
                        url: "remote.php"
                        }
                    }
                }
            },
            messages: {
                captcha: {
                    remote: "Please enter the text in the captcha."
                }
            }
        });
    });
</script>

HTML form:

<form id="signin_form">
    <input type="text" name="captcha">
    <input type="submit">
</form>

PHP:

$response = $_GET['captcha']; 
$answer  = 'captcha_answer';

if($response==$answer){
    echo 'true'; 
} else {
    echo 'false'; 
}

Sorry for shoving this part into an answer -- I'm not allowed to comment:

Keep in mind that setting the 'async' parameter to false will lock up your page until you get a response, which might not be what you want. The validation library should block normal form submission if it's waiting on a response for remote validation, at least in newer versions (I'm using jQuery 1.7.2 and Validation 1.10.0).

IIRC the jQuery Validate library will treat anything other than the exact string "true" as being an error. This can be used to pass different custom messages depending on the reason for rejection. json_encode adds extra quotation marks that cause jQuery Validate to see it as a custom error message.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I just dont underestand what is captcha_id ? –  MariaZ Sep 28 '12 at 4:06
1  
It's just an example of how to pass information from other fields in the form, if you need them (since you serialized the whole form in your example). If you don't need any fields except the captcha field, you can take out the data parameter entirely. –  mmitchell Sep 28 '12 at 4:12
    
hmm I dont know what i am doing but i just get the response "false" and nothings happens... this is in an error box, I dont underestand, so data, I am not really sure what is doing sorry.... Thanks! –  MariaZ Sep 28 '12 at 4:43
    
OK, I have removed the "data" parts of my answer to make it a little clearer. (The simplified answer is also tested and working.) –  mmitchell Sep 28 '12 at 5:48
    
When you say that "false" shows up in an error box, do you mean that it shows up where the form errors are supposed to show up (usually next to the field), or that it shows up in an alert or jQuery dialog box? If "false" is showing up next to the field, that means the Validator plugin is interpreting your "false" as a custom error message. If you're still using json_encode, take those function calls out and just echo the strings. If you mean an alert or jQuery dialog box, then I'm not quite sure. There's nothing that I can see that would cause an alert or jQuery dialog to pop up. –  mmitchell Sep 28 '12 at 5:54

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