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I am trying to remove duplicates from a list by creating a temporary array that stores the indices of where the duplicates are, and then copies off the original array into another temporary array while comparing the indices to the indices I have stored in my first temporary array.

public void removeDuplicates()
{
    double tempa [] = new double [items.length];
    int counter = 0;
    for ( int i = 0; i< numItems ; i++)
    {
        for(int j = i + 1; j < numItems; j++)
        {
            if(items[i] ==items[j])
            {
                tempa[counter] = j;
                counter++;

            }
        }
    }

    double tempb [] = new double [ items.length];
    int counter2 = 0;
    int j =0;
    for(int i = 0; i < numItems; i++)
    {
        if(i != tempa[j])
        {
            tempb[counter2] = items[i];
            counter2++;

        }
        else
        {
            j++;

        }
    }

    items = tempb;
    numItems = counter2;
}

and while the logic seems right, my compiler is giving me an arrayindexoutofbounds error at

tempa[counter] = j;

I don't understand how counter could grow to above the value of items.length, where is the logic flaw?

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2  
If you provided the stack trace with the exception, it would be a lot easier to answer your question. –  Tim Bender Sep 28 '12 at 0:59
    
How is numItems defined? Where does it get it's value from?? –  MadProgrammer Sep 28 '12 at 1:00
    
You're also not checking to see if the index already exists in the tempa array, which is allowing the counter be advanced twice for each duplicate –  MadProgrammer Sep 28 '12 at 1:01
    
numItems is just the size of the array –  user1702633 Sep 28 '12 at 1:05
    
duplicates of duplicates! Oh My! –  Tim Bender Sep 28 '12 at 1:07

8 Answers 8

You are making things quite difficult for yourself. Let Java do the heavy lifting for you. For example LinkedHashSet gives you uniqueness and retains insertion order. It will also be more efficient than comparing every value with every other value.

double [] input = {1,2,3,3,4,4};
Set<Double> tmp = new LinkedHashSet<Double>();
for (Double each : input) {
    tmp.add(each);
}
double [] output = new double[tmp.size()];
int i = 0;
for (Double each : tmp) {
    output[i++] = each;
}
System.out.println(Arrays.toString(output));
share|improve this answer
    
I would like to, but my understanding of the language and structure is limited and would like to get the logic down first. –  user1702633 Sep 28 '12 at 1:13
    
Nice answer, +1 :) –  Keen Learner Jan 14 '13 at 3:46

Done for int arrays, but easily coud be converted to double.

1) If you do not care about initial array elements order:

private static int[] withoutDuplicates(int[] a) {
    Arrays.sort(a);
    int hi = a.length - 1;
    int[] result = new int[a.length];
    int j = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < hi; i++) {
        if (a[i] == a[i+1]) {
            continue;
        }
        result[j] = a[i];
        j++;            
    }
    result[j++] = a[hi];
    return Arrays.copyOf(result, j);
}

2) if you care about initial array elements order:

private static int[] withoutDuplicates2(int[] a) {
    HashSet<Integer> keys = new HashSet<Integer>();
    int[] result = new int[a.length];
    int j = 0;
    for (int i = 0 ; i < a.length; i++) {
        if (keys.add(a[i])) {
            result[j] = a[i];
            j++;
        }
    }
    return Arrays.copyOf(result, j);
}

3) If you do not care about initial array elements order:

private static Object[] withoutDuplicates3(int[] a) {
    HashSet<Integer> keys = new HashSet<Integer>();
    for (int value : a) {
        keys.add(value);
    }
    return keys.toArray();
}
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Imagine this was your input data:

Index: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
Value: 1, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3

Then according to your algorithm, tempa would need to be:

Index: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, ....Exception!!!
Value: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 5, 6, 7, 8, 6, 7, 8, 7, 8, 8

Why do you have this problem? Because the first set of nested for loops does nothing to prevent you from trying to insert duplicates of the duplicate array indices!

What is the best solution?

Use a Set! Sets guarantee that there are no duplicate entries in them. If you create a new Set and then add all of your array items to it, the Set will prune the duplicates. Then it is just a matter of going back from the Set to an array.

Alternatively, here is a very C-way of doing the same thing:

//duplicates will be a truth table indicating which indices are duplicates.
//initially all values are set to false
boolean duplicates[] = new boolean[items.length];
for ( int i = 0; i< numItems ; i++) {
    if (!duplicates[i]) { //if i is not a known duplicate
        for(int j = i + 1; j < numItems; j++) {
            if(items[i] ==items[j]) {
                duplicates[j] = true; //mark j as a known duplicate
            }
        }
    }
}

I leave it to you to figure out how to finish.

share|improve this answer
    
what? ok so that's how counter is giving an error, let me wrap my head around that for a minute as I don't fully grasp it –  user1702633 Sep 28 '12 at 1:08
    
About the set- I would like to do so, but I have to master this removeduplicate first to implement a Set class. –  user1702633 Sep 28 '12 at 1:14
    
No need to implement a Set, the Java library has plenty for you to use. See Adam's answer for an example. I also gave you an alternative which correctly identifies the duplicates, so now all there is left to do is figure out how to make the array of unique entries. –  Tim Bender Sep 28 '12 at 1:20
import java.util.HashSet;

import sun.security.util.Length;


public class arrayduplication {
public static void main(String[] args) {
        int arr[]={1,5,1,2,5,2,10};
        TreeSet< Integer>set=new TreeSet<Integer>();
        for(int i=0;i<arr.length;i++){
            set.add(Integer.valueOf(arr[i]));
        }
        System.out.println(set);


    }

}
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You have already used num_items to bound your loop. Use that variable to set your array size for tempa also.

double tempa [] = new double [num_items];
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Instead of doing it in array, you can simply use java.util.Set.

Here an example:

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    Double[] values = new Double[]{ 1.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0, 3.0, 10.0, 10.0 };
    Set<Double> singleValues = new HashSet<Double>();

    for (Double value : values)
    {
        singleValues.add(value);
    }
    System.out.println("singleValues: "+singleValues);
    // now convert it into double array
    Double[] dValues = singleValues.toArray(new Double[]{});
}
share|improve this answer
    
Does HashSet preserve ordering? –  Adam Sep 28 '12 at 1:07
    
No it does not. If you require ordering, you can sort it after. –  user1697575 Sep 28 '12 at 15:33

Here's another alternative without the use of sets, only primitive types:

public static double [] removeDuplicates(double arr[]) {
    double [] tempa = new double[arr.length];
    int uniqueCount = 0;
    for (int i=0;i<arr.length;i++) {
        boolean unique = true;
        for (int j=0;j<uniqueCount && unique;j++) {
            if (arr[i] == tempa[j]) {
                unique = false;
            }
        }
        if (unique) {
            tempa[uniqueCount++] = arr[i];
        }
    }

    return Arrays.copyOf(tempa,  uniqueCount);
}

It does require a temporary array of double objects on the way towards getting your actual result.

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You can use a set for removing multiples.

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