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This code:

class testclass:
    def __init__(self,x,y):
        self.x = x
        self.y = y
        self.test()

    def test():
        print('test')

if __name__ == '__main__':
    x = testclass(2,3)

yields:

Error:
TypeError:test() takes no argument(1 given)

I'm calling the test function without any parameter, why does the error say that I have given one?

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You call the methods as self.test(). You should mentally translate that to test(self) to find out how the call will be "received" in the function's definition. Your definition of test however is simply def test(), which has no place for the self to go, so you get the error you observed.

Why is this the case? Because Python can only look up attributes when specifically given an object to look in (and looking up attributes includes method calls). So in order for the method to do anything that depends on which object it was invoked on, it needs to receive that object somehow. The mechanism for receiving it is for it to be the first argument.

It is possible to tell Python that test doesn't actually need self at all, using the staticmethod decorator. In that case Python knows the method doesn't need self, so it doesn't try to add it in as the first argument. So either of the following definitions for test will fix your problem:

def test(self):
    print('test')

OR:

@staticmethod
def test():
    print('test')

Note that this is only to do with methods invoked on objects (which always looks like some_object.some_method(...)). Normal function invocation (looking like function(...)) has nothing "left of the dot", so there is no self, so it won't be automatically passed.

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I'm missing the distinction between bound and unbound methods in this answer (in all of them up until now actually). This is what makes all the difference here. When calling unbound methods you need to pass in self explicitly, with bound ones (the usual case) it happens implicitly. –  Lukas Graf Sep 28 '12 at 2:29
    
@LukasGraf I view bound methods as a mechanism for implementing the auto-passing of self, not a core concept. Certainly they are well beyond the level that appears to be appropriate for this question. And in fact unbound methods have been removed from Python3 as a bad idea (which leaves bound methods as nothing but a mechanism for remembering self in order to pass it to the function), and the syntax of the OP's Python suggests Python3. –  Ben Sep 28 '12 at 3:10
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Pass self to your test method:

def test(self):
    print('test')

You need to do this because Python explicitly passes a parameter referring to the instantiated object as the first parameter. It shouldn't be omitted, even if there are no arguments to the method (because of the error specified).

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Is this applicable only for class functions? –  user1050619 Sep 28 '12 at 2:03
    
@user1050619 I haven't heard of any other auto-argument-passing in Python, but I could be wrong. –  Waleed Khan Sep 28 '12 at 2:04
2  
There are the standard decorators @classmethod and @staticmethod which can alter what is passed (or not passed) to the method as the first argument. –  mgilson Sep 28 '12 at 2:18
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Python always passes the instance as the first argument of instance methods, this means that sometimes the error messages concerning the number of arguments seems to be off by one.

class testclass:
    def __init__(self,x,y):
        self.x = x
        self.y = y
        self.test()

    def test(self):          ## instance method
        print('test', self)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    x = testclass(2,3)

If you don't need access to the class or the instance, you can use a staticmethod as shown below

class testclass:
    def __init__(self,x,y):
        self.x = x
        self.y = y
        self.test()

    @staticmethod
    def test():
        print('test')

if __name__ == '__main__':
    x = testclass(2,3)

A classmethod is similar, if you need access to the class, but not the instance

class testclass:
    def __init__(self,x,y):
        self.x = x
        self.y = y
        self.test()

    @classmethod
    def test(cls):
        print('test', cls)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    x = testclass(2,3)
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