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I'm experimenting with a design. It seems I can't get my CSS right. I have a horizontal list with a list in each of it's list items. The nested list doesn't seem to behave properly. What am I doing wrong here?

http://jsfiddle.net/89sqw/

The nested list doesn't have the squared list type, and the margin is all wrong.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Several prolems:

1) As mentioned by @bfavaretto, you can't have multiple elements with the same ID

2) You aren't closing your "P" tags. Closing tags have a slash (</p>)

3) You are using display: inline on an element which will contain block elements. This is invalid not good practice and will likely give you problems. Use inline-block instead:

#some-item {
  display: inline-block;
  vertical-align: top;
  *display: inline;
  *zoom: 1;
}

Edit: Tip - you can use special "child" selectors to only select immediate children of an element. http://jsfiddle.net/ryanwheale/F3cqD/

<ul>
  <li>
    Level 1
    <ul>
      <li>Level 2</li>
      <li>Level 2</li>
    </ul>
  </li>
  <li>Level 1</li>
</ul>

And these styles

ul > li {
  color: red;
}
ul > li > ul > li {
  color: green;
}
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For what it's worth, <p> does not have to be closed explicitly under the HTML5 spec. So can many other "normal" elements. See: dev.w3.org/html5/spec/single-page.html#syntax-tag-omission – Doug Stephen Sep 28 '12 at 2:15
    
Also, it doesn't matter whether you've set display: inline on an element and give it block children, however I agree that display: inline-block; is a better approach. – zzzzBov Sep 28 '12 at 2:16
    
Thanks for the comments. Just would like to point out that generally block elements inside inline is not good... especially in terms of styling. This goes for both block level DOM elements as well as elements with the CSS display:block property. It's also generally a good idea to close elements and wish the W3C didn't have these optional closing tags. I will always argue valid XML is good, even if the spec doesn't require it. – Ryan Wheale Sep 28 '12 at 2:20
    
@RyanWheale I agree completely. I'm just being pedantic; while it's not a good practice, it's not technically an error and it isn't the cause of his problem (or any problem, for that matter). – Doug Stephen Sep 28 '12 at 2:58
1  
@DougStephen - Thanks for that. While closing P tags are indeed optional, the user obviously forgot to close the paragraph in his example. However, this unclosed P tag is not part of the problem and shouldn't have been listed as such. I have updated my answer accordingly. Thx. – Ryan Wheale Sep 28 '12 at 3:05

Everything you apply to #tfList li is valid to your nested list items too (unless you override). Also, you shouldn't have two elements with the same id, use classes instead.

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The issue is easy to miss, but it comes from having overridden the display property of #tfList li elements to display: inline, and then mistakenly trying to re-set it to display: block;.

The correct display for a list item is:

display: list-item;

Also, to get the spacing back on the list items, set the left padding on the ul element.

Fiddle

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