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I want to use macros in a single Makefile to compile two programs. When I run make, it produces this output:

Makefile:27: warning: overriding commands for target `compose'
Makefile:24: warning: ignoring old commands for target `compose'
g++ -g `Magick++-config --cppflags` -c alphamask.cpp
g++ -g `Magick++-config --ldflags` -o alphamask alphamask.o -L /usr/lib64/ -lglut -lGL -lGLU -lMagick++ -lm

It only compiles the second program. Is there any way to have the macros compile both programs? Here's my current Makefile:

CC      = g++
C       = cpp

CFLAGS      = -g `Magick++-config --cppflags`
LFLAGS      = -g `Magick++-config --ldflags`

ifeq ("$(shell uname)", "Darwin")
  LDFLAGS     = -framework Foundation -framework GLUT -framework OpenGL -lMagick++ -lm
else
  ifeq ("$(shell uname)", "Linux")
    LDFLAGS     = -L /usr/lib64/ -lglut -lGL -lGLU -lMagick++ -lm
  endif
endif

ALPHA       = alphamask
COMP = compose 

${ALPHA}:   ${ALPHA}.o
    ${CC} ${LFLAGS} -o ${ALPHA} ${ALPHA}.o ${LDFLAGS}

${ALPHA}.o: ${ALPHA}.${C}
    ${CC} ${CFLAGS} -c ${ALPHA}.${C}

${COMP}:    ${COMP}.o
    ${CC} ${LFLAGS} -o ${COMP} ${COMP}.o ${LDFLAGS}

${COMP}.o:  ${COMP}.${C}
    ${CC} ${CFLAGS} -c ${COMP}.${C}


run:
    ./alphamask dhouse.png
    ./compose alphamask.png


clean:
    rm -f core.* *.o *~ ${ALPHA} ${COMP}
share|improve this question
    
You could write else ifeq ... on one line and lose one endif. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 28 '12 at 4:37

First problem:

COMP = compose 

${COMP}.o: ...

Adding a suffix to a variable isn't quite that simple in Make. And in this case you have some whitespace problems, which is why you're getting the warning messages, and why you couldn't build compose even if you tried.

Since you're a beginner, let's take a simple approach, crude but effective. We'll rewrite those rules, and add one at the top so that you can build both files with make:

all: alphamask compose

alphamask: alphamask.o
    ${CC} ${LFLAGS} -o alphamask alphamask.o ${LDFLAGS}

alphamask.o: alphamask.cpp
    ${CC} ${CFLAGS} -c alphamask.cpp

compose: compose.o
    ${CC} ${LFLAGS} -o compose compose.o ${LDFLAGS}

compose.o: compose.cpp
    ${CC} ${CFLAGS} -c compose.cpp

After you've got this working perfectly, a lot of improvements are possible.

EDIT:

Now that it's working perfectly, we can improve it. First let's put in automatic variables, to reduce the redundancy: $@ is the name of the target, $^ is the prerequisites, and $< is the first prerequisite.

all: alphamask compose

alphamask: alphamask.o
    ${CC} ${LFLAGS} -o $@ $^ ${LDFLAGS}

alphamask.o: alphamask.cpp
    ${CC} ${CFLAGS} -c $<

compose: compose.o
    ${CC} ${LFLAGS} -o $@ $^ ${LDFLAGS}

compose.o: compose.cpp
    ${CC} ${CFLAGS} -c $<

Now we see redundancy in the commands, so we can combine the rules:

all: alphamask compose

alphamask: alphamask.o

compose: compose.o

alphamask compose:
    ${CC} ${LFLAGS} -o $@ $^ ${LDFLAGS}

alphamask.o: alphamask.cpp    

compose.o: compose.cpp

alphamask.o compose.o:
    ${CC} ${CFLAGS} -c $<

Now we can replace the object (.o) rules with a pattern rule:

all: alphamask compose

alphamask: alphamask.o

compose: compose.o

alphamask compose:
    ${CC} ${LFLAGS} -o $@ $^ ${LDFLAGS}

%.o: %.cpp
    ${CC} ${CFLAGS} -c $<

And a static pattern rule for the executables. (We could use a pattern rule for these too, but that would be a little too general.)

EXECUTABLES = alphamask compose

.PHONY: all
all: $(EXECUTABLES)

$(EXECUTABLES): % : %.o
    ${CC} ${LFLAGS} -o $@ $^ ${LDFLAGS}

%.o: %.cpp
    ${CC} ${CFLAGS} -c $<

When you make these improvements, get each improvement working perfectly before you advance to the next.

share|improve this answer
    
tyler@Tyler-Satellite-A665:~/Desktop/404/assignment4$ make Makefile:18: *** missing separator. Stop. I get this error – user1210093 Sep 28 '12 at 4:01
    
Also what types of improvements do you suggest? – user1210093 Sep 28 '12 at 4:05
    
@user1210093: Line 18 is all: alphamask compose, is that right? – Beta Sep 28 '12 at 4:13
    
${CC} ${LFLAGS} -o alphamask alphamask.o ${LDFLAGS} this is line 18 – user1210093 Sep 28 '12 at 4:16
    
I wouldn't expect to see any problem with ${COMP}.o unless you're in the habit of leaving trailing blanks around your code, and even then I wouldn't expect much trouble. The revised makefile is too light on macros for my liking; you can at least use -o $@ to avoid repeating the output file name in the link lines; and I'd still prefer to see ${COMP}.o or a macro COMP.c = compose.c and another COMP.o = ${COMP.c:.c=.o} and use those where appropriate. Avoid repeating any plain name whenever you can. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 28 '12 at 4:16

I'm pretty sure you need a rule to make them all (using dependencies for both projects):

    all: ${ALPHA} ${COMP}

And then of course:

make all
share|improve this answer
    
I would like to have the macros do the work without having to type something like make all. When I had just one macro I could just type make and it would make it. Any ideas? – user1210093 Sep 28 '12 at 3:03
    
The best idea is to understand the tool you're using. From GNU make's documentation (gnu.org/software/make/manual/make.html), "[b]y default, make starts with the first target". If your first target is ${ALPHA}, then this will be executed by default. Putting the "all" target at the top of your Makefile will give the results you want. – GargantuChet Sep 28 '12 at 3:44
    
@GargantuChet Thanks that is good to know – user1210093 Sep 28 '12 at 4:19
    
If you specify no targets, make rebuilds the first target in the file. Conventionally, that target is all and it makes all the things that should be made by default. It is a pseudo-target, and in GNU make is suitable for being listed as a phony target: .PHONY: all (since you really don't need a file called 'all' lying around after the build). – Jonathan Leffler Sep 28 '12 at 4:26

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