Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

So I'm trying to learn python better and i've been using this website http://www.learnpython.org/

I'm on to functions right now, heres the code

#Add your functions here (before the existing functions) 

def list_benefits():
    myList = ['More organized code','More readable code','Easier code reuse','Allowing     programmers to share and connect code together']
    return myList

def build_sentence(info):
    addMe = " is a benefit of functions!"
    for i in info:
        meInfo = i + addMe
    return meInfo


def name_the_benefits_of_functions():
    list_of_benefits = list_benefits()
    for benefit in list_of_benefits:
        print build_sentence(benefit)

name_the_benefits_of_functions()

the output being

e is a benefit of functions!

e is a benefit of functions!

e is a benefit of functions!

r is a benefit of functions!

What am i missing to return the whole scentence

share|improve this question
4  
There's no OOP in your question. – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Sep 28 '12 at 3:08
    
Was going to fix it but tMC got it for me, thanks tMC – StaticExtasy Sep 28 '12 at 3:15
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Inside def build_sentence(info):

No need to loop over info since you'll get character by character.

def build_sentence(info):
    addMe = " is a benefit of functions!"
    return info + addMe

Also In this part:

for i in info:
        meInfo = i + addMe
    return meInfo

You are setting up meInfo every time in the loop constantly changing that value. At the end you are just returning the last value you got from the loop

share|improve this answer
    
Oh duh.... Thanks that explained it for me. – StaticExtasy Sep 28 '12 at 3:14

Your build_sentence() function iterates over the string passed to it, and binds each letter plus the other string in turn to meInfo. After it finishes with the last letter, it returns the value. The fix is to stop iterating over the string and instead just add the whole thing and return.

share|improve this answer
    
could you explain that to someone who doesn't understand the lingo quite well? – StaticExtasy Sep 28 '12 at 3:13
    
>>> for c in 'foo!': print c ... f o o ! – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Sep 28 '12 at 3:14

When you write:

def name_the_benefits_of_functions():
    list_of_benefits = list_benefits()
    for benefit in list_of_benefits:
        print build_sentence(benefit)

you call build_sentence() with a string argument. build_sentence then iterates over the characters in the string, with the effect that you see.

Instead, call build_sentence passing the entire list. This will iterate over the list, attaching the extra text to each item in the list (not each character in a string).

def name_the_benefits_of_functions():
    list_of_benefits = list_benefits()
    print build_sentence(list_of_benefits)

Also, inside build_sentence, you create and then throw away the text created from each list item, returning only the last item and extra text. If you want to print each one you can either move the print statement inside the build_sentence() function (and probably rename it to print_sentence() or you can create a list inside that function and return the list:

def build_sentence(info):
    addMe = " is a benefit of functions!"
    result = []
    for i in info:
        result.append(i + addMe)
    return result
share|improve this answer

The problem you're running into here is that your build_sentence() is taking an argument (each call is with a single string) but iterating over that and only returning the last result (thus it returns a sentence containing the last character of the string with the rest of the statically defined sentence).

If you iterate over a string then you'll be handing each character of the string.

Something like:

def build_sentence(benefit):
    '''Returns a sentence from a template filling in benefit as the subject'''
    return "%s is a benefit of functions!' % benefit

... will work with the rest of your code.

Alternatively you could have a build_sentences() function like:

def build_sentences(*benefits):
    '''Returns a list of sentences from a template touting each benefit'''
    results = list()
    for each in benefits:
        results.append("%s is a benefit if functions!" % each)
    return results

... and then simplt call that function one with a list of the benefits like:

build_sentences('More organized code','More readable code','Easier code reuse','Allowing programmers to share and connect code together')

... or

build_sentences(*myList)

This particular form (using *benefits as the parameters for the function definition, an either supplying a variable number of arguments to the function call, or using the *myList form to expand the contents of my list, applying that list into the "varargs" argument list is a little more advanced. (It's also not strictly necessary for this case, you could remove the * prefix from both the function's parameter definition and the function's calling arguments. In that case when calling the function with a literal list of benefits you'd have to wrap the literal string argument in [...] to make them into a literal string:

def tout_benefits(benefits):
    '''Given a list of benefits tout them using a template'''
    return [ "%s is a benefit of functions!" % x for x in benefits ]

tout_benefits(['More organized code','More readable code','Easier code reuse','Allowing programmers to share and connect code together'])
# Notice called with `[ ..., ..., ... ]`

Also notice, in this last form, I reduced the for ... loop into a more compact "list comprehension" ... and expression returning a list. I could have used that form in the previous example as well; but wanted to introduce it separately from making the point about varargs (variable parameter/arguments) handling.

Also note that you could use + expressions in place of "%s ..." % for all of these examples. However, the "string formatting" operator gives you considerably more control of exactly how values are interpolated into your template/strings and allows for multiple values, types, numeric precisions, and a number of other features far beyond simple string concatenation (using +).

share|improve this answer

Modify this function to return a list of strings as defined above:

def list_benefits():
    return "More organized code", "More readable code", "Easier code reuse", "Allowing programmers to share and connect code together"

def build_sentence(info):
    return "%s is a benefit of functions!"% (info)

Modify this function to concatenate to each benefit - " is a benefit of functions!":

def name_the_benefits_of_functions():
    list_of_benefits = list_benefits()
    for benefit in list_of_benefits:
        print build_sentence(benefit)

name_the_benefits_of_functions()
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.