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In my foreach loop I would like to stop after 50 items, how would you break out of this foreach loop when I reach the 50th item?

Thanks

foreach (ListViewItem lvi in listView.Items)
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3  
@Jade, I don't mean to disrespect Hamish, but I seriously think that you have accepted the wrong answer. If you know up front how many iterations of a loop you want to perform, there is a language construct specific to that, and that's a for loop. Breaking out of a foreach is not a bad thing, so Hamish's answer is not wrong...but as a typical rule of thumb if you can avoid Jumps (and that is what a break is) you should. I don't mean write convoluted code to avoid breaks, breaks sometimes are the best option, but in this case the most deterministic is a simple for loop. –  Tim Jarvis Aug 11 '09 at 23:01
    
@Tim Jarvis, I don't think you're disrespecting me. What you are saying (and it's a valid response to the question) is that @Jade M is asking the wrong question. Rather than "How do I break out of a foreach loop?" the real question is "What iterative code construct should I use if I want to iterate for a known maximum of iterations?" –  Hamish Smith Aug 12 '09 at 4:44
    
@Hamish, mmm, yep you are correct, that's it in a nutshell. –  Tim Jarvis Aug 12 '09 at 9:39

5 Answers 5

up vote 64 down vote accepted
int processed = 0;
foreach(ListViewItem lvi in listView.Items)
{
   //do stuff
   ++processed;
   if (processed == 50) break;
}

or use LINQ

foreach( ListViewItem lvi in listView.Items.Cast<ListViewItem>().Take(50))
{
    //do stuff
}

or just use a regular for loop (as suggested by @sgriffinusa and @Eric J.)

for(int i = 0; i < 50 && i < listView.Items.Count; i++)
{
    ListViewItem lvi = listView.Items[i];
}
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8  
+1 for LINQ approach –  Arnis L. Aug 11 '09 at 22:40
1  
The ListViewItemCollection does not have an implementaion of Take() defined. Your example above won't compile. You could probably do something like theListView.Items.Cast<ListViewItem>().Take(50) but I think that a simple for loop would be much more performent. –  Tim Jarvis Aug 11 '09 at 22:48
7  
Watch out, listView might not contain 50 items! use for(int i = 0; i < 50 && i < listView.Items.Count; i++) –  Ruben Aug 11 '09 at 22:49
    
ListViewItemCollection doesn't implement IEnumerable<T>, can't use LINQ –  Marc Aug 11 '09 at 22:49
    
Enumerable.Cast<T> fixes that up : The Cast<(Of <(TResult>)>)(IEnumerable) method enables the standard query operators to be invoked on non-generic collections by supplying the necessary type information. For example, ArrayList does not implement IEnumerable<(Of <(T>)>) , but by calling Cast<(Of <(TResult>)>)(IEnumerable) on the ArrayList object, the standard query operators can then be used to query the sequence. –  Steve Gilham Aug 11 '09 at 22:55

Why not just use a regular for loop?

for(int i = 0; i < 50 && i < listView.Items.Count; i++)
{
    ListViewItem lvi = listView.Items[i];
}

Updated to resolve bug pointed out by Ruben and Pragmatrix.

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3  
if (listView.Items.Count < 50) throw new OutOfRangeException(); –  Armin Aug 11 '09 at 22:53

Or just use a regular for loop instead of foreach. A for loop is slightly faster (though you won't notice the difference except in very time critical code).

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int count = 0;
foreach (ListViewItem lvi in listView.Items)
{
    if(++count > 50) break;
}
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This should work.

int i = 1;
foreach (ListViewItem lvi in listView.Items) {
    ...
    if(++i == 50) break;
}
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