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    this
    is just
    an example.

Lets assume the above is out.txt. I want to read out.txt and write onto the same file.

    <Hi >
    <this>
    <is just>
    <an example.>

Modified out.txt. I want to add tags in the beginning and end of some lines. As I will be reading the file several times I cannot keep writing it onto a different file each time.

EDIT 1 I tried using "+<" but its giving an output like this :

Hi
this
is just
an example.
<Hi >
<this>
<is just>
<an example.>
 **out.txt**

EDIT 2 Code for reference :

open(my $fh, "+<", "out.txt");# or die "cannot open < C:\Users\daanishs\workspace\CCoverage\out.txt: $!";
     while(<$fh>)
     {
        $s1 = "<";
        $s2 = $_;
        $s3 = ">";
        $str = $s1 . $s2 . $s3;
        print $fh "$str";
     }
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The very idea of what you are trying to do is flawed. The file starts as

H  i  /  t  h  i  s  /  ...

If you were to change it in place, it would look as follows after processing the first line:

<  H  i  >  /  i  s  /  ...

Notice how you clobbered "th"? You need to make a copy of the file, modify the copy, the replace the original with the copy.

The simplest way is to make this copy in memory.

my $file;
{ # Read the file
   open(my $fh, '<', $qfn)
      or die "Can't open \"$qfn\": $!\n";
   local $/;
   $file = <$fh>;
}

# Change the file
$file =~ s/^(.*)\n/<$1>\n/mg;

{ # Save the changes
   open(my $fh, '>', $qfn)
      or die "Can't create \"$qfn\": $!\n";
   print($fh $file);
}

If you wanted to use the disk instead:

rename($qfn, "$qfn.old")
   or die "Can't rename \"$qfn\": $!\n";

open(my $fh_in, '<', "$qfn.old")
      or die "Can't open \"$qfn\": $!\n";
open(my $fh_out, '>', $qfn)
      or die "Can't create \"$qfn\": $!\n";

while (<$fh_in>) {
   chomp;
   $_ = "<$_>";
   print($fh_out "$_\n");
}

unlink("$qfn.old");

Using a trick, the above can be simplified to

local @ARGV = $qfn;
local $^I = '';
while (<>) {
   chomp;
   $_ = "<$_>";
   print(ARGV "$_\n");
}

Or as a one-liner:

perl -i -pe'$_ = "<$_>"' file
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you.This helped my code be more efficient. –  Daanish Dec 4 '12 at 12:32

Read contents in memory and then prepare required string as you write to your file. (SEEK_SET to zero't byte is required.

#!/usr/bin/perl

open(INFILE, "+<in.txt");
@a=<INFILE>;
seek INFILE, 0, SEEK_SET ;
foreach $i(@a)
{ 
    chomp $i;
    print INFILE "<".$i.">"."\n";
}

If you are worried about amount of data being read in memory, you will have to create a temporary result file and finally copy the result file to original file.

share|improve this answer
    
Will be able to use this method if I have write only some selected lines such as lines ending with a semicolon etc... ? –  Daanish Sep 28 '12 at 11:02
1  
if ($i =~ /;$/) {print INFILE "<".$i.">"."\n";} –  user1703205 Sep 28 '12 at 11:16

You could use Tie::File for easy random access to the lines in your file:

use Tie::File;
use strict;
use warnings;

my $filename = "out.txt";
my @array;
tie @array, 'Tie::File', $filename or die "can't tie file \"$filename\": $!";

for my $line (@array) {
  $line = "<$line>";
  # or $line =~ s/^(.*)$/<$1>/g; # -- whatever modifications you need to do
}

untie @array;

Disclaimer: Of course, this option is only viable if the file is not shared with other processes. Otherwise you could use flock to prevent shared access while you modify the file.

Disclaimer-2 (thanks to ikegami): Don't use this solution if you have to edit big files and are concerned about performance. Most of the performance loss is mitigated for small files (less than 2MB, though this is configurable using the memory arg).

share|improve this answer
    
If the file is tiny, that's a crazy amount of overhead. If the file isn't tiny, this is going to be insanely slow as the entire file is written every time you change a line. –  ikegami Sep 28 '12 at 5:14
    
@ikegami: Thanks for your comment. Sorry, the OP didn't say anything about file size, I didn't know that he has to handle very big files. Btw it's not written every time it changes: see the section about "Autodeferring". –  vstm Sep 28 '12 at 5:25
1  
Autodefer means it won't rewrite the file unless it has to, but it will have to if the file doesn't fit in the buffer, so it's crazy slow if it doesn't fit in memory. And if does fits in memory, you're wasting a crazy amount of resources to handle the case where it wouldn't fit in memory. –  ikegami Sep 28 '12 at 5:40
1  
He didn't need to say anything about size. Like I said, it's hugely wasteful for small and large files. –  ikegami Sep 28 '12 at 5:43
    
and convenient, in situations where the waste is irrelavant –  ysth Sep 28 '12 at 7:32

One option is to open the file twice: Open it once read-only, read the data, close it, process it, open it again read-write (no append), write the data, and close it. This is good practice because it minimizes the time you have the file open, in case someone else needs it.

If you only want to open it once, then you can use the +< file type - just use the seek call between reading and writing to return to the beginning of the file. Otherwise, you finish reading, are at the end of the file, and start writing there, which is why you get the behavior you're seeing.

share|improve this answer

Need to specify

use Fcntl qw(SEEK_SET);

in order to use

seek INFILE, 0, SEEK_SET;

Thanks user1703205 for the example.

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