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I have a stored procedure that opens a CURSOR on a select statement that iterates over a table of 15M rows (This table is a simpl import of a large CSV).

I need to normalize that data by inserting various pieces of each row into 3 different tables (capture auto-update ID's, use them in forein key constraints, and such).

So I wrote a simple stored procedure, open CURSOR, FETCH the fields into varialbes and do the 3 insert statements.

I'm on a small DB server, default mysql installation (1 cpu, 1.7GB ram), I had hoped for a few hours for this task. I'm at 24 hours+ and top shows 85% wasted CPU.

I think I have some kind of terrible inefficiency. Any ideas on improving the efficiency of the task? Or just determining where the bottleneck is?


root@devapp1:/mnt/david_tmp# vmstat 10
procs -----------memory---------- ---swap-- -----io---- -system-- ----cpu----
 r  b   swpd   free   buff  cache   si   so    bi    bo   in   cs us sy id wa
 0  1    256  13992  36888 1466584    0    0     9    61    1    1  0  0 98  1
 1  2    256  15216  35800 1466312    0    0    57  7282  416  847  2  1 12 85
 0  1    256  14720  35984 1466768    0    0    42  6154  387  811  2  1 10 87
 0  1    256  13736  36160 1467344    0    0    51  6979  439  934  2  1  9 89

DROP PROCEDURE IF EXISTS InsertItemData;

DELIMITER $$
CREATE PROCEDURE InsertItemData() BEGIN 
    DECLARE spd TEXT;
    DECLARE lpd TEXT;
    DECLARE pid INT;
    DECLARE iurl TEXT;

    DECLARE last_id INT UNSIGNED;
    DECLARE done INT DEFAULT FALSE;

    DECLARE raw CURSOR FOR select t.shortProductDescription, t.longProductDescription, t.productID, t.productImageURL 
                           from frugg.temp_input t;
    DECLARE CONTINUE HANDLER FOR NOT FOUND SET done = TRUE;
    OPEN raw;

    read_loop: LOOP
        FETCH raw INTO spd, lpd, pid, iurl;

        IF done THEN
            LEAVE read_loop;
        END IF;

        INSERT INTO item (short_description, long_description) VALUES (spd, lpd);
        SET last_id = LAST_INSERT_ID();
        INSERT INTO item_catalog_map (catalog_id, catalog_unique_item_id, item_id) VALUES (1, CAST(pid AS CHAR), last_id);
        INSERT INTO item_images (item_id, original_url) VALUES (last_id, iurl);
    END LOOP;

    CLOSE raw;
END$$
DELIMITER ;
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1  
Just a thought but you might be running out of physical memory at which point mysql has to start swapping blocks... this usually decreases performance drastically. But it's hard to tell without actually looking into the code and logs etc.. –  Erik Sep 28 '12 at 4:53
    
Great thinking, but if I'm not wrong, my update above shows no issue there. –  David Parks Sep 28 '12 at 5:02
1  
Two things I would try: 1. Drop indexes on the tables that get inserted when doing the inserts. Add it back after all inserts are done. 2. Instead of copying row by row, dump and migrate the whole table, add an auto_increment field, copy 2 more times, then drop the fields that you don't need. –  sn00k4h Sep 28 '12 at 5:24
    
Great points! You should post this as an answer, it might be the best I can do. –  David Parks Sep 28 '12 at 5:27
1  
I don't know about MySql but in another RDBMS, cursors suck hard. Databases tend to be good at set based operations. –  Jodrell Sep 28 '12 at 16:05
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

MySQL will almost always perform better executing straight SQL statements, than looping inside a stored procudure.

That said, if you are using InnoDB tables, your procedure will run faster inside a START TRANSACTION / COMMIT block.

Even better would be to add an AUTO_INCREMENT to the records in frugg.temp_input, and querying against that table:

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS temp_input2;

CREATE TABLE temp_input2 (
    id INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    shortProductDescription TEXT, 
    longProductDescription TEXT,
    productID INT,
    productImageURL TEXT,
    PRIMARY KEY (id)
);

START TRANSACTION;

INSERT INTO 
    temp_input2
SELECT
    NULL AS id,
    shortProductDescription, 
    longProductDescription,
    productID,
    productImageURL
FROM
    frugg.temp_input;

INSERT 
    INTO item 
(
    id, 
    short_description, 
    long_description
) 
SELECT 
    id,
    shortProductDescription AS short_description, 
    longProductDescription AS long_description
FROM
    temp_input2
ORDER BY
    id;

INSERT INTO 
    item_catalog_map
(
    catalog_id, 
    catalog_unique_item_id, 
    item_id
)
SELECT 
    1 AS catalog_id,
    CAST(productID AS CHAR) AS catalog_unique_item_id,
    id AS item_id
FROM
    temp_input2
ORDER BY
    id;

INSERT INTO 
    item_images 
(
    item_id, 
    original_url
) 
SELECT 
    id AS item_id,
    productImageURL AS original_url
FROM
    temp_input2
ORDER BY
    id;

COMMIT;

Even better than the above, is before loading the .CSV file into frugg.temp_input, you add an AUTO_INCREMENT field to it, saving you the extra step of creating/loading temp_input2 shown above.

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I'm at a similar thought as Ross offered, but without knowing more of your tables, indexes, what the "auto-increment" column names are, I would just do direct inserts... However, you'll have an issue if you encounter any duplicates which I didn't see any checking for.. I would just insert as follows and have appropriate indexes to help the re-join (based on short and long product descriptions).

I would just try by inserting and inserting from the select, then inserting from that select... such as...

INSERT INTO item 
      ( short_description, 
        long_description ) 
   SELECT
        t.ShortProductDescription,
        t.LongProductDescription
     from
        frugg.temp_input t;

done, 15 million inserted... into items table... Now, add to the catalog map table...

INSERT INTO item_catalog_map
      ( catalog_id,
        catalog_unique_item_id,
        item_id )
   SELECT
         1 as Catalog_id,
         CAST( t.productID as CHAR) as catalog_unique_item_id,
         item.AutoIncrementIDColumn as item_id
      from
         frugg.temp_input t
            JOIN item on t.ShortProductDescription = item.short_desciption
                     AND t.LongProductDescription = item.long_description

done, all catalog map entries with corresponding "Item ID" inserted...

INSERT INTO item_images
      ( item_id,
        original_url )
   SELECT
         item.AutoIncrementIDColumn as item_id,
         t.productImageURL as original_url
      from
         frugg.temp_input t
            JOIN item on t.ShortProductDescription = item.short_desciption
                     AND t.LongProductDescription = item.long_description

Done with the image URLs.

share|improve this answer
    
That join (frugg.temp_intput with item) gives me 15M rows * 15M rows = 215 Trillion with EXPLAIN PLAN, I guess I'd need an index added there. –  David Parks Oct 9 '12 at 10:34
    
@DavidParks, as I stated in original answer, you may have an issue with duplicates, and since I don't know the basis of your records and validation you have, I couldn't restrict it. I would have considered some candidate key combination to prevent duplicates on whatever columns made sense... again, not knowing more about your data. –  DRapp Oct 9 '12 at 12:17
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