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This is partly related to this SO question.

I have two classes, both of them are templated, e.g.:

class Base
{
public:
    template< class T > void operator=(T other)
    {
        //irrelevant
    }

    Derived toDerived()
    {
        Derived d;
        //do stuff;
        return d;
    }
};

class Derived: public Base
{
public:
    template< class T > void foo( T other )
    {
        //do stuff 
    }
};

As you can see, both are templated, and inside of the Base class function I need to create an instance of Derived. Of course, the way it is now I'm getting an error Derived does not name a type. Unfortunately though, I can't just forward-declare Derived, because it will lead to another error variable 'Derived d ' has initializer but incomplete type.

From the SO question I mentioned above I understand that the compiler needs to know about all the template parameters to be able to forward-declare it correctly. But obviousle I can't just move Derived declaration up, because it will lead to exactly same problem, just vice-versa.

Is there a way to accomplish this?

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Does this have anything to do with templates? –  juanchopanza Sep 28 '12 at 5:58
2  
I would argue it's Derived that should have fromBase. –  GManNickG Sep 28 '12 at 5:59
    
a. you are missing ; after the class definitions. b. I agree with GManNickG - what you did is not good OOP. –  elyashiv Sep 28 '12 at 6:02
    
@elyashiv, thx, I accidentally removed them while making the example ;) –  SingerOfTheFall Sep 28 '12 at 6:03
    
@GManNickG, that's a good point, I'll consider it ;) But anyway, I would like to know if it's possible the way I put it, even for the purpose of learning if it's fundamentally possible... –  SingerOfTheFall Sep 28 '12 at 6:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
// Declare, but do not define
class Derived;

class Base {
public:    
    // Declare, but do not define
    // at this point Derived must be declared to be able
    // to use it in the return type
    Derived toDerived();
};

// Define
class Derived: public Base {
    // Rest of definition
};

// At this point Derived is defined

// Define
Derived Base::toDerived()
{
    // Implementation goes here
}
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Thanks ;) It's so simple that I feel ashamed xD –  SingerOfTheFall Sep 28 '12 at 6:11

This problem has nothing with templates. You could just use forward declaration of Derived to compile declaration of Base::toDerived() and move the function definition depending on Derived after Derived definition:

// Forward declaration of Derived
class Derived;

// Definition of Base
class Base
{
public:
   // Base::toDerived() declaration only
   Derived toDerived();
};

// Definition of Derived
class Derived: public Base
{
public:
...
};

// Base::toDerived() definition
inline Derived Base::toDerived()
{
   Derived d;
   // Do dirty things
   return d;
}
share|improve this answer

You can do

class Derived;

class Base
{
public:
    template< class T > void operator=(T other)
    {
        //irrelevant
    }

    Derived toDerived();
};

class Derived: public Base
{
public:
    template< class T > void foo( T other )
    {
        //do stuff 
    }
};

Derived Base::toDerived()
{
    Derived d;
    //do stuff;
    return d;
}

As you can see it has nothing to do with templates.

Also, this design simply doesn't feel right.

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