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I have 2 dictionaries

a = {'I': [1,2], 'II': [1,2], 'III': [1,2]}
b = {'I': [3,4], 'II': [3,4], 'IV': [3,4]}

how can i merge them such that i get the following result

c = merge_dicts(a,b)

where c is {'I': [1,2,3,4], 'II': [1,2,3,4], 'III': [1,2], 'IV': [3,4]}

Is there a good pythonic way of doing this?

Note that I am a python newbie, even though I am using words like pythonic. Thanks in advance.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you need ALL values:

from itertools import chain
from collections import defaultdict

a = {'I': [1,2], 'II': [1,2], 'IV': [1,2]}
b = {'I': [3,4], 'II': [3,4], 'V': [3,4]}

d = defaultdict(list)
for key, value in chain(a.iteritems(), b.iteritems()):
    d[key].extend(value)
d

Output:

defaultdict(<type 'list'>, {'I': [1, 2, 3, 4], 'II': [1, 2, 3, 4], 'V': [3, 4], 'IV': [1, 2]})
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2  
+1 of course itertools can just do this, haha. –  Matthew Adams Sep 28 '12 at 6:17
    
Good answer. +1. –  mgilson Sep 28 '12 at 6:17
    
+1 this solution is the only one till now which works for Python 2.5 –  kidmenot Sep 28 '12 at 11:55
1  
And FWIW, to remove the "default" behavior from your dict after creating it, you could set d.default_factory = None. Then it starts behaving like a regular dict again. –  mgilson Apr 17 '13 at 15:08

Are you sure they have the same keys? You could do:

c = dict( (k,a[k]+b[k]) for k in a )

Addition of lists concatenates so a[k] + b[k] gives you something like [1,2]+[3,4] which equals [1,2,3,4]. The dict constructor can take a series of 2-element iterables which turn into key - value pairs.

If they don't share the keys, you can use sets.

aset = set(a)
bset = set(b)
common_keys = aset & bset
a_only_keys = aset - bset
b_only_keys = bset - aset

c = dict( (k,a[k]) for k in a_only_keys )
c.update( (k,b[k]) for k in b_only_keys )
c.update( (k,a[k]+b[k]) for k in common_keys )
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that was quick :) how do i go about it if they dont share all the keys (just a few of them)? –  kidmenot Sep 28 '12 at 6:13
    
@kidmenot -- See my edit –  mgilson Sep 28 '12 at 6:15
1  
+1 nice use of sets –  Matthew Adams Sep 28 '12 at 6:17
    
It's too late, but: {key: a.get(key, []) + b.get(key, []) for key in set(a) | set(b)} –  kalgasnik Apr 17 '13 at 15:03
    
@kalgasnik -- True. You could even avoid the set creation by a.viewkeys() | b.viewkeys() (a.keys() | b.keys() for python3.x) –  mgilson Apr 17 '13 at 15:06
>>> from collections import Counter
>>> class ListAccumulator(Counter):
...     def __missing__(self, key):
...         return []
... 
>>> a = {'I': [1,2], 'II': [1,2], 'III': [1,2]}
>>> b = {'I': [3,4], 'II': [3,4], 'IV': [3,4]}
>>> 
>>> ListAccumulator(a) + ListAccumulator(b)
Counter({'IV': [3, 4], 'I': [1, 2, 3, 4], 'II': [1, 2, 3, 4], 'III': [1, 2]})
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>>> a = {'I': [1,2], 'II': [1,2]}
>>> b = {'I': [3,4], 'II': [3,4]}
>>> {key:a[key]+b[key] for key in a}
{'I': [1, 2, 3, 4], 'II': [1, 2, 3, 4]}

Note that this only works if they share keys exactly.

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that was quick :) how do i go about it if they dont share all the keys (just a few of them)? –  kidmenot Sep 28 '12 at 6:11
    
I'm writing that up right now, but it'll take a minute. –  Matthew Adams Sep 28 '12 at 6:12
    
Nevermind- those are both better approaches than the ifs-galore junk I was working on. –  Matthew Adams Sep 28 '12 at 6:26
    
good try though, thanx :) –  kidmenot Sep 28 '12 at 6:28

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