Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can one write sth like:

class Test(object):
    def _decorator(self, foo):
        foo()

    @self._decorator
    def bar(self):
        pass

This fails: self in @self is unknown

I also tried:

@Test._decorator(self)

which also fails: Test unknown

If would like to temp. change some instance variables in the decorator and the run the decorated method, before changing them back.

Thanks.

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 34 down vote accepted

What you're wanting to do isn't possible. Take, for instance, whether or not the code below looks valid:

class Test(object):

    def _decorator(self, foo):
        foo()

    def bar(self):
        pass
    bar = self._decorator(bar)

It, of course, isn't valid since self isn't defined at that point. The same goes for Test as it won't be defined until the class itself is defined (which its in the process of). I'm showing you this code snippet because this is what your decorator snippet transforms into.

So, as you can see, accessing the instance in a decorator like that isn't really possible since decorators are applied during the definition of whatever function/method they are attached to and not during instantiation.

If you need class-level access, try this:

class Test(object):

    @classmethod
    def _decorator(cls, foo):
        foo()

    def bar(self):
        pass
Test.bar = Test._decorator(Test.bar)
share|improve this answer

You can decorate the decorator:

import decorator

class Test(object):
    @decorator.decorator
    def _decorator(foo, self):
        foo(self)

    @_decorator
    def bar(self):
        pass
share|improve this answer

Would something like this do what you need?

class Test(object):
    def _decorator(foo):
        def magic( self ) :
            print "start magic"
            foo( self )
            print "end magic"
        return magic

    @_decorator
    def bar( self ) :
        print "normal call"

test = Test()

test.bar()

This avoids the call to self to access the decorator and leaves it hidden in the class namespace as a regular method.

>>> import stackoverflow
>>> test = stackoverflow.Test()
>>> test.bar()
start magic
normal call
end magic
>>> 

edited to answer question in comments:

How to use the hidden decorator in another class

class Test(object):
    def _decorator(foo):
        def magic( self ) :
            print "start magic"
            foo( self )
            print "end magic"
        return magic

    @_decorator
    def bar( self ) :
        print "normal call"

    _decorator = staticmethod( _decorator )

class TestB( Test ):
    @Test._decorator
    def bar( self ):
        print "override bar in"
        super( TestB, self ).bar()
        print "override bar out"

print "Normal:"
test = Test()
test.bar()
print

print "Inherited:"
b = TestB()
b.bar()
print
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply. Yes this would work if it wasn't for the fact that I wanted the decorator to perform some ops on the instance variables - and that would require self. –  hcvst Aug 12 '09 at 14:11
3  
The decorator or the decorated function? Note the returned "magic" function that wraps bar is receiving a self variable above when "bar" is called on an instance and could do anything to the instance variables it wanted before and after ( or even whether or not ) it called "bar". There is no such thing as instance variables when declaring the class. Did you want to do something to the class from within the decorator? I do not think that is an idiomatic usage. –  Michael Speer Aug 12 '09 at 14:21
    
Thanks Michael, only now saw that this is what I wanted. –  hcvst Jan 18 '11 at 16:05
    
I find this solution much nicer than the accepted answer, because it allows the use of @ decorator syntax at the point of definition. If I have to put decorator calls at the end of the class, then it isn't clear that the functions are being decorated. It's a bit weird that you can't use @staticmethod on the decorator itself, but at least it works. –  mgiuca Apr 16 '12 at 1:52
1  
@extraeee: check the edit I made. you need to qualify the given decorator as a staticmethod, but only after you're done using it ( or assigning the staticmethod version to a different name ) –  Michael Speer Dec 15 '13 at 1:16

Decorators seem better suited to modify the functionality of an entire object (including function objects) versus the functionality of an object method which in general will depend on instance attributes. For example:

def mod_bar(cls):
    # returns modified class

    def decorate(fcn):
        # returns decorated function

        def new_fcn(self):
            print self.start_str
            print fcn(self)
            print self.end_str

        return new_fcn

    cls.bar = decorate(cls.bar)
    return cls

@mod_bar
class Test(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.start_str = "starting dec"
        self.end_str = "ending dec" 

    def bar(self):
        return "bar"

The output is:

>>> import Test
>>> a = Test()
>>> a.bar()
starting dec
bar
ending dec
share|improve this answer

I use this type of decorator in some debugging situations, it allows overriding class properties by decorating, without having to find the calling function.

class myclass(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.property = "HELLO"

    @adecorator(property="GOODBYE")
    def method(self):
        print self.property

Here is the decorator code

class adecorator (object):
    def __init__ (self, *args, **kwargs):
        # store arguments passed to the decorator
        self.args = args
        self.kwargs = kwargs

    def __call__(self, func):
        def newf(*args, **kwargs):

            #the 'self' for a method function is passed as args[0]
            slf = args[0]

            # replace and store the attributes
            saved = {}
            for k,v in self.kwargs.items():
                if hasattr(slf, k):
                    saved[k] = getattr(slf,k)
                    setattr(slf, k, v)

            # call the method
            ret = func(*args, **kwargs)

            #put things back
            for k,v in saved.items():
                setattr(slf, k, v)

            return ret
        newf.__doc__ = func.__doc__
        return newf 

Note: because I've used a class decorator you'll need to use @adecorator() with the brackets on to decorate functions, even if you don't pass any arguments to the decorator class constructor.

share|improve this answer

I found this question while researching a very similar problem. My solution is to split the problem into two parts. First, you need to capture the data that you want to associate with the class methods. In this case, handler_for will associate a Unix command with handler for that command's output.

class OutputAnalysis(object):
    "analyze the output of diagnostic commands"
    def handler_for(name):
        "decorator to associate a function with a command"
        def wrapper(func):
            func.handler_for = name
            return func
        return wrapper
    # associate mount_p with 'mount_-p.txt'
    @handler_for('mount -p')
    def mount_p(self, slurped):
        pass

Now that we've associated some data with each class method, we need to gather that data and store it in a class attribute.

OutputAnalysis.cmd_handler = {}
for value in OutputAnalysis.__dict__.itervalues():
    try:
        OutputAnalysis.cmd_handler[value.handler_for] = value
    except AttributeError:
        pass
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.