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Writing an iPhone app in Objective-C, I have a date in string form (in UTC format, with a Z on the end to denote zero UTC offset, or zulu time), which I need to parse into an NSDate object.

A bit of code:

NSDateFormatter* df = [[NSDateFormatter alloc]init];
[df setDateFormat:@"yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSSZ"];
NSString* str = @"2009-08-11T06:00:00.000Z";
NSDate* date = [df dateFromString:str];
Running this through the debugger, date ends up nil! I'm assuming it has something to do with my date format string.

How can I fix it to correctly parse the date string?

A thought would be to make the Z in the date format literal, a la setting the date format to yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSS'Z'.

That would work, except when the Z is parsed as a literal, the date loses offset information, and so is ambiguous, and therefore interpreted to be local time.

For example, if the string to parse was 2009-08-11T06:00:00.000Z (6:00 zulu time) it would be interpreted as 6:00 local time, and an incorrect offset would then be applied. It would then be parsed as 2009-08-11T06:00:00.000-600 (12:00 zulu time) with the offset depending on the user's offset.

Thanks!

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6 Answers 6

up vote 19 down vote accepted

I've had this problem also, I'm not sure if it's a API bug within Apple's code, or my lack of understanding, but I've worked around it by using hour offsets in my date strings.

If you change the code in your example to:

NSDateFormatter* df = [[NSDateFormatter alloc]init];
[df setDateFormat:@"yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSSZ"];
NSString* str = @"2009-08-11T06:00:00.000-0700";   // NOTE -0700 is the only change
NSDate* date = [df dateFromString:str];

It will now parse the date string. Of course the -0700 hours is my offset, you'd have to change it to yours. Hope this helps.

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In your example, the change in -0700 is not only 7 in place of 0 but also removing of trailing Z. Did you investigate that also? –  mouviciel Aug 12 '09 at 8:26
    
Yes, the Z is an alternate form of -0000, Greenwich Mean. It's in RFC 3339 (I just skimmed it though, it might need perusing.) ietf.org/rfc/rfc3339.txt –  NWCoder Aug 12 '09 at 8:37
    
This approach is simple enough, but in my particular situation I can't control which format I get the date strings in, and the only way they're provided is in zulu time (with a Z). I'll look into doing a string replace though, replacing the Z with -0000 beforehand, and if it works out, I'll post the code and mark this as the answer. Thanks! –  Eric Freese Aug 12 '09 at 19:08
3  
Ok, I got it fixed. Here's the pertinent line: [df dateFromString:[str stringByReplacingOccurrencesOfString:@"Z" withString:@"-0000"]] –  Eric Freese Aug 12 '09 at 21:21
    
The fact that NSDateFormatter doesn't know how to interpret the 'Z' is not a bug. It may be that 'Z' is an alternate form of -0000, GMT in RFC 3339 but I don't think that is what NSDateFormatter uses. NSDateFormatter uses the unicode standard found here unicode.org/reports/tr35/tr35-10.html#Date_Format_Patterns where 'Z' is a format specifier for a three character time zone code. –  jj0b Apr 20 '12 at 21:29

I think you need to put single quotes around the Z in the format string, because the Z actually means something to the formatter and you want it to represent a literal character instead.

    [df setDateFormat:@"yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSS'Z'"];
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Yup, it's exactly the same as the T field which you're quoting. –  AlBlue Aug 12 '09 at 8:47
1  
That would work, except when the Z is parsed as a literal, the date loses offset information, and so is ambiguous, and therefore interpreted to be local time. For example, if the string to parse was 2009-08-11T06:00:00.000Z (6:00 zulu time) it would be interpreted as 6:00 local time, and an incorrect offset would then be applied. It would then be parsed as 2009-08-11T06:00:00.000-600 (12:00 zulu time) with the offset depending on the user's offset. You can see how this would be incorrect. I'll work on a workaround, possibly replacing the Z with -0000 prior to parsing or something. –  Eric Freese Aug 12 '09 at 18:52

Most answers suggest you to treat 'Z' as a literal character. Do not do this!

The Z actually means that the date is offset by 0 to UTC (+0000).

This is according to the time zone format ISO8601:

ISO 8601 time zone format: A constant, specific offset from UTC, which always has the same format except UTC itself ("Z").

"-08:00"

"Z"

What you want to do is use the following format for your NSDateFormatter:

 NSDateFormatter *formatter = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];
                                  // 2013-11-18T23:00:00.324Z
                                  [formatter setTimeZone:[NSTimeZone localTimeZone]];
                                  [formatter setDateFormat:@"yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSSZZZZZ"];
                                  return formatter;

By repeating the Z five times, you tell the formatter to use ISO8601 when parsing the string.

Bonus:

  • Use one to three *Z*s for RFC 822 GMT format.
  • Use four *Z*s for localized GMT format.

For more information check this document.

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There's no need to manipulate the string. Simply set the time zone on the NSDateFormatter (and the locale while you're at it):

NSDateFormatter * formatter = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];
[formatter setTimeZone:[NSTimeZone timeZoneForSecondsFromGMT:0]];
[formatter setLocale:[NSLocale systemLocale]];
[formatter setDateFormat:@"yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSS'Z'"];

And parse date strings as needed:

NSDate * value = [formatter dateFromString:@"2012-03-01T23:08:25.000Z"];
NSLog(@"%@", value); // prints 2012-03-01 23:08:25 +0000
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this may help you.. the "Z" is a literal for the time zone code. try using "o" (the letter, not zero). The literal "o" means UTC offset. I ran into this a while back, I hope this helped you.

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OK, i think that "o" is for cold fusion.. I found this info: "z" With DateTime values, represents the signed offset of the local operating system's time zone from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), measured in hours. (e.g. +6) "zz" As z but with leadin zero (e.g. +06) "zzz" With DateTime values, represents the signed offset of the local operating system's time zone from UTC, measured in hours and minutes. (e.g. +06:00) -Terence F –  Terence F Nov 21 '09 at 20:34
-(NSDate*)dateFromZulu:(NSString*)str {
    if (str == nil) {
        NSLog(@"Error getting date");
        return [NSDate date];
    }

    NSDateFormatter *f = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];
    [f setDateFormat:@"yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss Z"];
    NSDate *ret = [f dateFromString:[str stringByReplacingOccurrencesOfString:@"Z" withString:@" +0000"]];
    [f release];

    if (ret == nil) {
        ret = [NSDate date];
        NSLog(@"Error formatting date (%@)",str);       
    }   
    return ret;     
}
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