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Does one of these two ways have to be preferred or is it only a matter of taste?

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use warnings;
use strict;
use DBI;

my $db = 'sqlite_db';

####################   A   ####################

sub get_database_handle {
    my ( $db ) = @_;
    my $dbh;
    eval {
        $dbh = DBI->connect( "DBI:SQLite:$db", '', '', {...} )
        or die DBI->errstr;
    };
    if ( $@ ) {
        print $@;
        return;
    }
    return $dbh;
}

DATABASES: while ( 1 ) {
    # choose a database from a list of databases
    # ...
    my $dbh = get_database_handle( $db );
    next DATABASES if not defined $dbh;
    # ...
    # do something with the database
}

####################   B   ####################

sub get_database_handle {
    my ( $db ) = @_;
    my $dbh = DBI->connect( "DBI:SQLite:$db", '', '', {...} ) 
    or die DBI->errstr;
    return $dbh;
}

DATABASES: while ( 1 ) {
    # choose a database from a list of databases
    # ...
    my $dbh;
    eval { $dbh = get_database_handle( $db ); };
    if ( $@ ) {
        print $@;
        next DATABASES;
    }
    # ...
    # do something with the database
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why eval at all? What are you going to do when you can't get a database handle?

At the very least, the subroutine should either return a database handle or die, so no eval in there.

If you really have something productive to do when there is a database error, then eval outside of the subroutine. Not necessary around just the subroutine, could be even wider scope, as appropriate for your error handling logic.

But if all you want is terminate the program and print an error, just let the exception bubble up.

share|improve this answer
    
I edited the code to give a hint of my intentions. –  sid_com Sep 28 '12 at 8:02
2  
There I would probably have the eval across one whole loop iteration, to also cover other kinds of errors (not just database handle failures). And in case of an error, you may want to remove the db from the list of options, at least for some time. –  Thilo Sep 28 '12 at 8:04

It really makes no sense to use RaiseError => 1 at all if your code is going to look like that. If you want to keep that code layout, use RaiseError => 0 instead. (You can always turn it on later using $dbh->{RaiseError} = 1;`.)

sub get_database_handle {
    my ( $db ) = @_;
    return DBI->connect("DBI:SQLite:$db", '', '', {
        ...
        RaiseError => 0,
        PrintError => 1,
    });
}

for my $db ( ... ) {
    my $dbh = get_database_handle( $db )
       or next;

    ...
}

That said, I suggest that you continue using RaiseError => 1, but that you change your code layout instead. Specifically, you should widen the scope of the eval.

sub get_database_handle {
    my ( $db ) = @_;
    return DBI->connect("DBI:SQLite:$db", '', '', {
        ...
        RaiseError => 1,
        PrintError => 0,
    });
}

for my $db ( ... ) {
    if (!eval {    
        my $dbh = get_database_handle( $db );

        ...

        1  # No exception
    }) {
        warn("Error processing database $db: $@");
    }
}

This will catch any errors, not just database connection errors.

share|improve this answer
    
But I also could use several evals instead of widen the scope of one eval? –  sid_com Sep 28 '12 at 18:07
    
Sure, if you need that kind of resolution. But if you're going to put an eval around every statement, just use RaiseError => 0. That's why I mentioned both solutions. –  ikegami Sep 28 '12 at 18:11
    
I've posted my question to this comment in a new thread. –  sid_com Sep 29 '12 at 8:25

It depends on the preferred way of handling errors in the rest of your project.

  • If you plan to use exceptions, let your function throw them.

  • If you are going to handle errors manually via conditionals, don't throw (eval inside).

I myself prefer exceptions. They are loud (you know something is broken!), plus stack traces via Carp::confess/Carp::longmess and $SIG{__DIE__} are a nice bonus in case of a large codebase.

Here's an (un)success story. A month or two ago we rolled out broken code that silently corrupted data due to unchecked return value from DB-handling function. It was in production for a day. Resurrecting the data was a world of pain.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for advocating exceptions. As for the "eval inside" option, if one does not like exceptions (even after your tales from the world of pain), one would probably use RaiseError=>0 and then there is no need to eval at all. –  Thilo Sep 28 '12 at 9:31

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