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I have an array of hashes like so:

my @array = [
             {1 => "Test1"},
             {},
             {1 => "Test2"},
            ];

I try to filter out the {} from this array so that the end result is an array without any {} like so:

my @array = [
             {1 => "Test1"},
             {1 => "Test2"},
            ];

I tried using something like this but it doesn't work:

my @new_array = grep(!/{}/, @array);
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If you really did mean to have an array with just one element, then the solution would be my @new_array = map [ grep %$_, @$_ ], @array;. I doubt it, though. –  ikegami Sep 28 '12 at 7:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The grep command can take a regex as argument, but also an arbitrary block of code. And please do not try to match Perl code with regexes, this doesn't work.

Instead, we ask for the number of keys in the anonymous hash:

my @new_array = grep { keys %$_ } @array;

This selects all hashes in @array where the number of keys is not zero.

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+1. You can omit scalar here, though it adds clarity to this code. –  raina77ow Sep 28 '12 at 7:41
    
I actually think it is clearer without scalar ... a grep block is always interpreted as boolean anyway. –  Dondi Michael Stroma Sep 28 '12 at 7:46
    
@Dondi Michael Stroma, Hum, that makes me wonder... %$_ is special in boolean context (more efficient than it would be in other scalar context). I wonder if counts a grep callback result as boolean. If so, you could drop keys. Technically, you can drop keys either way, it's just a question of efficiency. –  ikegami Sep 28 '12 at 7:51
5  
@ikegami I thought keys was required, but I guess not. It seems it is faster though. Benchmark: timing 10000000 iterations of with_keys, without_keys... with_keys: 8 wallclock secs ( 8.59 usr + 0.01 sys = 8.60 CPU) @ 1162790.70/s (n=10000000) without_keys: 25 wallclock secs (25.05 usr + 0.03 sys = 25.08 CPU) @ 398724.08/s (n=10000000) –  Dondi Michael Stroma Sep 28 '12 at 8:03
1  
@Dondi Michael Stroma, The optimisation was added to 5.12.0 according to perl5120delta. –  ikegami Sep 28 '12 at 8:32

You need something like this:

my @new_array = grep(keys %$_, @array);

The /.../ in your code is a regular expression. It checks if each element in the array contains certain characters. However, your array contains references to hashes, so you need to dereference each element and then see if that is empty.

Also, this declaration is incorrect:

my @array = [
             {1 => "Test1"},
             {},
             {1 => "Test2"},
            ];

The brackets create an array reference, while you just want an array. Just use parentheses instead:

my @array = (
             {1 => "Test1"},
             {},
             {1 => "Test2"},
            );
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Nope, The {} are still in the @new_array... –  goe Sep 28 '12 at 7:41
    
Sorry, my initial code had an error. It is fixed now. –  dan1111 Sep 28 '12 at 7:42

1) A small correction:

my @array = [
    {1 => "Test1"},
    {},
    {1 => "Test2"},
];

Is really a 1-element array with array ref inside. You probably need

my @array = (
    {1 => "Test1"},
    {},
    {1 => "Test2"},
);

2) The grep expr:

my @new_array = grep { scalar %$_ } @array;

Hash returns 0 in scalar context if it's empty, and something like "17/32" otherwise. So the grep will only pick non-empty arrays.

UPDATE: As @raina77ow suggests, scalar may be omitted! So it's even shorter (though I still prefer explicit scalar for clarity in my code).

my @new_array = grep { %$_ } @array;
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Or even my @new_array = grep %$_, @array; :) –  ikegami Sep 28 '12 at 7:56
1  
@ikegami Code without enclosing {} is one of funny things that make me sad... –  Dallaylaen Sep 28 '12 at 11:16
1  
I wonder what's people problems with the expression form of grep when they do foo() if bar(); and foo() for bar(); all the time. –  ikegami Sep 28 '12 at 14:57

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