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I'm having difficulty trying to turn a algorithm that was hinted to us into usable code. We are given a Direction enum that has the 8 coordinates (N, NE, NW, S, SE. SW. E, W) along with the exit HERE.

This is the hinted algorithm:

getPathToExit(row, col):
  if (row, col) is outside of the map:
    return an empty list
  else if (row, col) is an obstacle:
    return an empty list
  else if (row, col) is marked as visited or as deadend:
   return an emtpy list
  else if (row, col) is the exit:
    //optional: mark exit as visited
   return a list containing Direction.HERE
  else:
   //try to find a path from current square to exit:
    mark current square as visited (that is, part of path)
      for each neighbor of current square:
        path = path from neighbor to exit
          if path is not empty:
             add (direction to neighbor) to start of path
               return path
   //after for loop: no path exists from this square to exit
   mark current square as deadend
     return empty list

This is the code I have been working on for a while:

public java.util.ArrayList<Direction> getPathToExit(){

for (int x=0; x<map.length; x++){
    for (int y=0; y<map[x].length; y++){
        if (map[x][y]=='S'){
            this.startRow=x;
            this.startCol=y;
        }
    }
}
System.out.println("start "+startRow+", "+startCol);
return getPathToExit(this.startRow, this.startCol);
}

private java.util.ArrayList<Direction> getPathToExit(int row, int col){

  Direction [] dirs = Direction.values();
  ArrayList<Direction> path = new ArrayList<Direction>();

getPathToExit(row, col);

    if (row < 0 || col < 0 || row > map.length || col > map[row].length){
        return null;
    }
    else if (map[row][col] != ' '){
        return null;
    }
    else if (map[row][col] == 'E'){
        path.add(Direction.HERE);
        return path;
    }
    else {
        for (int x=0; x<dirs.length-1; x++){
            int nextRow = row + dirs[x].getRowModifier();
            int nextCol = col + dirs[x].getColModifier();
            path = getPathToExit(nextRow, nextCol);
        }
    }
return path;
}

This is the enum class:

public enum Direction {
   N, NE, E, SE, S, SW, W, NW, HERE;

 /**
 * Returns the X/column change on the screen that is associated with
 * this direction: -1 for W, 0 for N/S, and +1 for E.
 */
  public int getColModifier() {
    int mod;
    switch (this) {
     case NW:
     case W:
     case SW:
     mod = -1;
    break;
  case NE:
  case E:
  case SE:
    mod = +1;
    break;
  default:
    mod = 0;
    break;
  }
return mod;
}

/**
 * Returns the Y/row change on the screen that is associated with
 * this direction: -1 for N, 0 for E/W, and +1 for south.
 */
public int getRowModifier() {
 int mod;
 switch (this) {
   case N:
   case NE:
   case NW:
    mod = -1;
    break;
  case S:
  case SE:
  case SW:
    mod = +1;
    break;
  default:
    mod = 0;
    break;
  }
return mod;
}

/** As {@link #getColModifier()} */
public int getXModifier() {
 return this.getColModifier();
}

 /** As {@link #getRowModifier()} */
public int getYModifier() {
  return this.getRowModifier();
}

/**
 * Returns the direction that is the opposite of this one.
 * For example, <code>Direction.NE.reverse() == Direction.SW</code>.
 * (The opposite of HERE is still HERE though.)
 */
public Direction reverse() {
  if (this == HERE) {
    return this;
  }else {
    int reversed = (this.ordinal() + 4) % 8;
   Direction[] dirs = Direction.values();
    return dirs[reversed];
  }
}

}

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Please be more specific about what you think is wrong with your code –  mtsvetkov Sep 28 '12 at 7:36
    
I keep getting StackOverFlowError and it's just not working. I've been working at it for a couple hours now and I just can't seem to figure it out. –  user1699330 Sep 28 '12 at 7:39
    
getPathToExit is recursively calling itself in line 3 –  guido Sep 28 '12 at 7:40
1  
every maze can be solved by walking through while always touching the wall on the left or on the right side –  Boris Pavlović Sep 28 '12 at 7:41
2  
You don't mark current square as visited. So it keeps going between same squares infinitely and you get stackoverflow. –  Nikita Beloglazov Sep 28 '12 at 7:42

1 Answer 1

There are two issues in the code:

(1) In the main for loop:

for (int x=0; x<dirs.length-1; x++){
      int nextRow = row + dirs[x].getRowModifier();
      int nextCol = col + dirs[x].getColModifier();
      path = getPathToExit(nextRow, nextCol);
}

You need to check if the recursive call: getPathToExit() returned a not null list. If it had, you should break the loop and push the relevant direction to its start. You already found a path - not point to keep on checking the rest!


(2) In order for your algorithm to be complete (find a solution if one exists), you need to maintain a visited set, and avoid revisiting already visited nodes.
Have a look at the following example:

-------
|S |x1|
-------
|x2|E |
-------

where all are valid squares (no obstacles), S is the start and E is the end.

Now, assume the order of directions is right,left, ....

The code (without visited set) will do the following:

go right (to x1).
go right - out of maze, go back.
go left (to S).
go right (to x1).
go right - out of maze, go back.
go left (to S)
....

You are in an infinite loop! (one known draw back of DFS)
The StackOverflowError is usually an indication that this is the issue, the call stack is full from all the recursive calls - and an error is thrown.

To fix it, you need to maintain a visited set, and avoid revisitting already visited nodes. With this set, and the above maze (order of directions is right, left, down, ...) what will happen is:

go right (to x1)
go right - out of maze, go back.
go left (to S) - already visitted, go back.
go down (to E) - found target, return it.

A more advanced alternative is using Iterative Deepening DFS - which basically mean, you are limitting the length of the path to l, and iteratively increase this l. I'd ignore this alternative for this time, it is a bit more advanced.


As a side note, your algorithm is an implementation of DFS, which is complete with a visited set and in finite graphs (always finds a solution if one exists), but not optimal (does not guarantee to find the shortest path). To find the shortest path, you might want to use BFS instead.

Also: I assume the recursive call in the third line of the method is a leftover that is there for debugging. It shouldn't be there.

share|improve this answer
    
How would I go about marking my path? Do I add a map[nextRow][nextCol]='x'? –  user1699330 Sep 28 '12 at 8:41
    
@user1699330: I do not understand the question, what do you mean "marking the path"? How to get the directions? It is done as I mentioned in part (1) - you need to check (in main for loop) if the returned list is not null. If it isn't, you need to push at the head of the list the direction you traveled at this iteration (and break the loop)? Or do you mean "how do you maintain the visitted set?" –  amit Sep 28 '12 at 8:44
    
Yes, How do I maintain a visited set? –  user1699330 Sep 28 '12 at 8:50
    
@user1699330: Your suggestion seems reasonable, but it modifies the maze. If you want to avoid it, you can enumerate the squares (num = col*number_of_rows + row for example), and use a Set<Integer> (which is passed as a parameter to all recursive calls), and check if the square you are visitting is already in this set. At the beginning of each recursive call - add the number representing the square to the set. –  amit Sep 28 '12 at 8:54

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