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Given a generic type T in C#, I wonder how to acquire type Q, which is equal to T? for non-nullable T, and T for already nullable T.

The question arose from real code. I want to unify access to parameters passed through query string in my ASP.NET application. And I want to specify a default value of the same type, but ensure null can be passed as a default value.

public static T FetchValue<T>(
   string name, 
   <T? for non-nullable, T otherwise> default_value = null)  // How to write this?
{
  var page = HttpContext.Current.Handler as Page;

  string str = page.Request.QueryString[name];

  if (str == null)
  {
    if (default_value == null)
    {
      throw new HttpRequestValidationException("A " + name + " must be specified.");
    }
    else
    {
      return default_value;
    }
  }

  return (T)Convert.ChangeType(str, typeof(T));
}

Currently I'm forced having two overloads of the FetchValue - one without default value, and one with it:

public static T FetchValue<T>(string name);
public static T FetchValue<T>(string name, T default_value);

It works fine, but I wonder whether it is possible to merge both functions like this.

In C++ I would use type-traits, like PromoteNullable<T>::type with two specializations of PromoteNullable for both nullable and non-nullable types. But what about C#?

share|improve this question
    
I personally think the code is clearer from the call site if you just have two overloads. –  Matthew Watson Sep 28 '12 at 7:49
    
@MatthewWatson The code from the call site is exactly the same for both implementations. –  Mikhail Sep 28 '12 at 7:50
    
The compiler would struggle to generate suitable code for return default_value; if default_value was this "maybe a T, maybe a T?" type. Even return (T)default_value; needs different code if it's a T?. Remember, the compiler has to generate one piece of code that is suitable for all instantiations. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Sep 28 '12 at 8:05
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever What do you mean the generated code would be the same for different instantiations?.. That's not true for C++ templates. Is that true for C# generics? –  Mikhail Sep 28 '12 at 8:08
    
C# generics are a runtime feature, not a compile time feature as in C++'s templates. As such, the compiler has to generate one sequence of IL that will be valid for any supplied type parameter. (There is some variation in how that IL is translated to machine code at JIT time, based on value/reference types, but the IL is always the same) –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Sep 28 '12 at 8:10
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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Doesn't directly answer the question as posed, but I'd write this:

    public static T FetchValue<T>(string name)
    {
        T value;
        if (TryFetchValue(name, out value))
            return value;
        throw new HttpRequestValidationException("A " + name + " must be specified.");
    }

    public static T FetchValue<T>(string name, T default_value)
    {
        T value;
        if (TryFetchValue(name, out value))
            return value;
        return default_value;
    }

    private static bool TryFetchValue<T>(
         string name,
         out T value)
    {
        var page = HttpContext.Current.Handler as Page;

        string str = page.Request.QueryString[name];

        if (str == null)
        {
            value = default(T);
            return false;
        }

        value = (T)Convert.ChangeType(str, typeof(T));
        return true;
    }

So the bulk of the code exists only once - and you can even now actually have the calling code choose to have null as a default value, if it so chooses.


Even if you could create the parameter declaration you wanted, this line would still be an issue:

return default_value;

If it turned out that default_value was a T? rather than a T, then the above code doesn't work. Even if you do a cast:

return (T)default_value;

there's still an issue - that to cast from T? to T, the compiler actually has to insert a call to obtain the Value property of the nullable. But that call wouldn't be valid if the type of default_value was just T.

In C# Generics, the compiler has to create one piece of IL for the method. There's no way to insert an optional piece of code that may access Value.

share|improve this answer
    
That's definitely a good start –  Baboon Sep 28 '12 at 8:23
    
That's almost how it is currently implemented :) –  Mikhail Sep 28 '12 at 8:28
    
Ok, I didn't receive an answer to my question, but I have an explanation why there is no answer. Thanks, I accept this. –  Mikhail Sep 28 '12 at 8:57
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Since your return type is T, and T beeing a value type, it can't be null. So you'll always have to pass a nullable type, since you want a null back, right?

Try this one, it allows you to pass a nullable value type (i) and a normal reference type (o):

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int? i = 5;
    object x = new object();

    object o = FetchValue("x", i);
    o = FetchValue("x", x);
}

private static T? FetchValue<T>(string name, T? p) where T : struct
{
    T? result = (T?)FetchValue(name, (object)p);
    return result;
}

private static T FetchValue<T>(string name,
    T default_value = default (T)) // default(T) where T is a reference type will always be null!
    where T : class
{
    // do whatever you want
    var page = HttpContext.Current.Handler as Page;

    string str = page.Request.QueryString[name];

    if (str == null)
    {
        if (default_value == null)
        {
            throw new HttpRequestValidationException("A " + name + " must be specified.");
        }
        else
        {
            return default_value;
        }
    }

    return (T)Convert.ChangeType(str, typeof(T));
}

Please keep in mind that's all syntax foo, since you'll end up with an object type for T anyway. This however is required, since only object's are able to be null.

share|improve this answer
    
In this case I cannot use FetchValue<int>("x") without default value. I don't want a null back, I want a default value, or an exception. –  Mikhail Sep 28 '12 at 8:54
    
When using FetchValue<int>("x") and having a return type of T you can't get null back since int is not a reference type. When talking about default_value I tought you always want a reference/nullable type back. (What of course does not very mutch sence, since you would use object as the return type then) –  GameScripting Sep 28 '12 at 9:08
add comment

There is my example:

//Page extension
static class PageExtensions
{
    private static T FetchValue<T>(this Page page, string name, object defaultValue)
    {
        string str = page.Request.QueryString[name];
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(str))
        {
            if (defaultValue != null)
                return (T)defaultValue;

            throw new HttpRequestValidationException("A " + name + " must be specified.");
        }

        //not the best way
        return (T)Convert.ChangeType(str, typeof(T));
    }

    public static T FetchValueFromCurrentPage<T>(string name, T defaultValue)
    { 
      var page = HttpContext.Current.Handler as Page;
      if(page == null)
        throw new InvalidOperationException("Current handler is not Page");
      return page.FetchValue<T>(name, defaultValue);
    }

    public static T FetchValueFromCurrentPage<T>(string name) where T : class
    {   
        return FetchValueFromCurrentPage(name, (T)null);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice thought about making an extension function. But the FetchValue itself is not type-safe, e.g. one may call FetchValue<int>("id", "foo"), and it will compile. –  Mikhail Sep 28 '12 at 13:29
    
Also I don't understand why FetchValue and FetchValueFromCurrentPage don't have symmetric prototypes. It is impossible to use structs without default values for the latter, like this: PageExtensions.FetchValueFromCurrentPage<int>("id"). –  Mikhail Sep 28 '12 at 13:30
    
I think, that you need something like 'return default(T)' in case of T is ValueType. And in your example: null value can't be default value - it's not good practice. I want return null value as default value for example. –  arkhivania Sep 29 '12 at 17:44
add comment

You can specify the class constraint to make sure callers pass in a reference type (which is nullable):

public static T FetchValue<T>(
   string name, 
   T default_value = null) where T : class //!
{
  var page = HttpContext.Current.Handler as Page;

  string str = page.Request.QueryString[name];

  if (str == null)
  {
    if (default_value == null)
    {
      throw new HttpRequestValidationException("A " + name + " must be specified.");
    }
    else
    {
      return default_value;
    }
  }

  return (T)Convert.ChangeType(str, typeof(T));
}

In this case, you delegate the responsibility of casting T to T? when necessary to the caller, which is nice anyway: he may know better!

share|improve this answer
    
Same as for @Terric - I really want both nullable and non-nullable (class ans structs) types allowed. At least ints and strings. –  Mikhail Sep 28 '12 at 8:30
add comment

Try the following:

private static T FetchValue<T>(string name, Nullable<T> default_value = null) where T : struct
{
    var page = HttpContext.Current.Handler as Page;

    string str = page.Request.QueryString[name];

    if (str == null)
    {
        if (default_value == null)
        {
            throw new Exception("A " + name + " must be specified.");
        }
        else
        {
            return (T)Convert.ChangeType(default_value, typeof(T));
        }
    }

    return default(T);
}

Nullable types must be a value type and so you must set the constraint to struct. You're declaring type T as Nullable and converting the type if there is a value else you return the default of type T which in this case is null. When calling this method you must also set the type explicitly like so:

int? val = FetchValue<int>("name");

Returning a string

As a string is a nullable reference type you correctly say that it can't be used with this function. In that case I would create a new struct and for strings use this instead.

struct NullableString
{
    public string Value;
}

Call the function like this.

var val = FetchValue<NullableString>("blah", new NullableString() { Value = "default" });
share|improve this answer
    
I do want this function to work with nullable types, at least with strings. –  Mikhail Sep 28 '12 at 8:27
    
@Mikhail updated for using string –  Paul Aldred-Bann Sep 28 '12 at 8:37
    
This obfuscates code on the caller site, so I don't think it is practical. Nice thought to wrap string in struct though. –  Mikhail Sep 28 '12 at 8:50
    
@Mikhail I suppose you could have the calls to this function proxied, so in the event of a string type being passed it will wrap up in this struct. But I agree, it'll start getting very messy from there on. –  Paul Aldred-Bann Sep 28 '12 at 8:59
add comment

You can do what you want in this simple way:

public static T FetchValue<T>(string name, T defaultValue = null) where T : class { }
public static T? FetchValue<T>(string name, T? defaultValue = null) where T : struct { }
share|improve this answer
    
This requires two overloads, while I already have solution with two overloads, which I find easier. –  Mikhail Sep 28 '12 at 8:55
    
@Mikhail it is the simpliest and the most efficient way to go. –  AgentFire Sep 28 '12 at 9:53
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