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I am designing some classes for my project in C++ at the moment but I got a problem. I want to create a camera class which holds all the needed values (e.g. transformation matrices) but the function which renders the camera should be exchangeable. This sounds like a usual case for the strategy pattern. Thus I created an interface which defines the render-function and gave the the camera class a pointer to this interface. The problem is that the render function needs access to all the data in the camera class and therefore I gave this function a pointer to the camera class as a parameter. It looks like this:

#include "ICameraRender.h"

class Camera{
private:
    ICameraRender*      _cameraRender;

public:
    Camera();
    Camera(ICameraRender& cameraRender);
    ~Camera();

    void renderCamera(){  _cameraRender->render(this); }


    void setCameraRender(ICameraRender& cameraRender);
        /..../

};


class ICameraRender{
public:
    virtual ~ICameraRender(){

    }

    //Override me
    virtual void render(Camera* camera) = 0;
};

This doesn't seem to be an elegant solution due to the liability to an infity loop (calling camera->renderCamera() in the render-function in ICameraRender). Is there a better solution to this problem?

Regards

EDIT:

I came up with another solution. Since the function which operates on the camera's data, only needs access to the data I thought I could split up the camera class itself. A class called Camera and CameraModel. The last one holds all the needed data and the first one does operations on it. Therefore I just have to pass a pointer to CameraModel to my function:

class CameraModel{
private:
    /...data.../
public:
   /...setter and getter.../
};

class Camera{
private: 
    CameraModel*   _cameraModel;
    ICameraRender* _cameraRender;

public:
Camera();
    Camera(ICameraRender& cameraRender);
    ~Camera();

    void renderCamera(){  _cameraRender->render(_cameraModel); }

    void setCameraRender(ICameraRender& cameraRender);
        /..../
};

class ICameraRender{
public:
    virtual ~ICameraRender(){

    }

    //Override me
    virtual void render(CameraModel* cameraModel) = 0;
};

Now the render-function (which only calculates new values for the camera according to user input) does no longer have access to the renderCamera-function. What do you think about this solution?

Regards Stan

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It makes more sense to have camera as something that the renderer uses, not the other way around. That is, renderer is given one or more cameras whose perspective of the world it must render according to state of the camera. Are you sure you're going about this the right way? –  Martinsh Shaiters Sep 28 '12 at 9:08
    
That's exactly what I want to do. I think I chose the wrong name for the functions. :) The camera gets some input and therefore it should calculate the new position and rotation etc. The actual renderer can access to these data via getter methods. –  Stan Sep 28 '12 at 9:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're right, it does seem like a bad design. :)

I don't see why a camera render needs access to a camera. I'm sure you can pass something else as parameter. The render doesn't need access to all the camera members, so you can just pass the ones it needs (and, if there's a lot of them, wrap them in a structure CameraConfig or something like that).

If the different renders need different parameters, you can make a separate hierarchy with ICameraConfig.

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I followed somewhat your approach with the CameraConfig structure in my new solution. :) Thanks! –  Stan Sep 28 '12 at 9:53

This is probably a great time to use Policy-based design to implement the strategy pattern, especially since you're using C++ and you're probably targeting a compiler older than 2002. (Since C++'s templating mechanism is so awesome, we can get the strategy pattern for free this way!)

First: Make your class accept the strategy/policy class (in this case, your ICameraRenderer) at a template parameter. Then, specify that you are using a certain method from that template parameter. Make calls to that method in the camera class...

Then implement your strategies as a plain old class with a render() method!

This will look something like this:

class Camera<RenderStrategy>{
    using RenderStrategy::render;

    /// bla bla bla 

    public:
        void renderCamera(){  render(cameraModel); }
};

class SpiffyRender{
    public:
        void render(CameraModel orWhateverTheParameterIs){ // some implementation goes somewhere }
};

Whenever you want to make a camera that uses one of those policy/strategies:

// the syntax will be a bit different, my C++ chops are rusty; 
// in general: you'll construct a camera object, passing in the strategy to the template  parameter
auto SpiffyCamera = new Camera<SpiffyRender>();

(Since your renderer strategy doesn't have any state, that makes this approach even more favorable)

If you are changing your renderer all the time, then this pattern / approach becomes less favorable... but if you have a camera that always renders the same way, this is a slightly nicer approach. If your renderer has state, you can still use this method; but you'll want a reference to the instance inside the class, and you won't use the Using:: statement. (In general, with this, you write less boilerplate, don't need to make any assignments or allocations at runtime, and the compiler works for you)

For more about this,see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Policy-based_design Or read Modern C++ Design... it's a great read, anyways! http://www.amazon.com/Modern-Design-Generic-Programming-Patterns/dp/0201704315

As an unrelated aside: You may want to look into some of the goodness that C++x11 gives you. It'll really clean up your code and make it safer. (Especially the shared/unique/etc ptr classes.)

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