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I've got a std::vector<Foo> where Foo is a class containing Foo( Foo&& ) noexcept.

Adding objects to the container works flawlessly, however erasing them using std::vector::erase( iterator ) does not, GCC 4.7 tries to call the assignment operator which I have deleted. The exact error message is:

error: use of deleted function ‘Foobar& Foobar::operator=(const Foobar&)

Edit: Of course std::vector calls the assignment operator, not the copy constructor (you can see that in the error message, too). Fixed it in the description, sorry.

Here's example source code as requested:

#include <vector>

class Foo {
    public:
        Foo() {}
        Foo( Foo&& other ) noexcept {}

        Foo( const Foo& ) = delete;
        Foo& operator=( const Foo& ) = delete;
};

int main() {
    std::vector<Foo> v;

    v.push_back( Foo{} );
    v.erase( v.begin() );
}
share|improve this question
1  
Do you have some demo code? – kennytm Sep 28 '12 at 9:43
    
Without code, it's hard to see what the problem is – sehe Sep 28 '12 at 9:48
    
Source code added. :-) – Tank Sep 28 '12 at 9:52
    
So your class is named Foo but you're getting an error message about Foobar? Something doesn't match. Real code, please. – Pete Becker Sep 28 '12 at 14:52
up vote 8 down vote accepted

The problem is that you did not provide a move assignment operator. This is part of the vector Movable requirements for some functions.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh. Hehe. I just typed up my own sample, and automatically added the move assignment operator. Explains why it worked for me then :) +1 – sehe Sep 28 '12 at 9:58
    
+1 well spotted! – Walter Sep 28 '12 at 10:01
1  
The compiler error gives it all away- no suitable operator=. – Puppy Sep 28 '12 at 14:08

I couldn't reproduce it. Turns out good habits go a long way: I had the move asignment operator defined.

Live on GCC 4.7.2: http://liveworkspace.org/code/36c600c285f2c91649fd4f73784c2c00

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

struct Foo
{
    Foo() {}

    Foo(Foo const&) = delete;
    Foo(Foo&&) throw() { }

    Foo& operator=(Foo const&) = delete;
    Foo& operator=(Foo&&) throw() { return *this; }
};

int main(int argc, char* args[])
{
    std::vector<Foo> v;
    v.emplace_back();
    v.emplace_back();
    v.emplace_back();
    v.emplace_back();

    auto it = v.begin();
    it++;
    v.erase(it);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Actually a very good idea, however erase() doesn't like the move iterator, it says there's no matching function call for std::move_iterator<...>. – Tank Sep 28 '12 at 9:53
1  
I just noticed, and updated the code. It turns out that in 'inventing' the replicating sample I automatically defined the move assignment operator, as @DeadMG suggests. Habits... – sehe Sep 28 '12 at 9:57
    
Hehe, interesting. Thanks a lot, providing the move assignment operator too makes perfect sense. – Tank Sep 28 '12 at 10:01
    
Any particular reason for using throw() over noexcept, or are they synonymous? – ildjarn Sep 28 '12 at 19:20
    
@ildjarn My local gcc version didn't yet accept the keyword. I'd guess they would roughly mean the same, though throw() has many troubles so I'd prefer noexcept – sehe Sep 28 '12 at 20:07

DeadMG's answer is excellent, however I'd like to promote another way of writing the assignment operator:

struct Foo {
    Foo() {}

    Foo(Foo const&) = delete;
    Foo(Foo&&) throw() { }

    Foo& operator=(Foo) throw() { return *this; }
};

Since you require a fresh temporary at the start of the method, the compiler will pick either the copy or move constructor to create this temporary on its own, and you do not have to write both a copy assignment operator AND a move assignment operator :)

share|improve this answer
    
He doesn't anyway, because his class is uncopyable. – Puppy Sep 28 '12 at 14:10
    
@DeadMG: I'll avoid entering in the details of what is automatically defaulted and what is automatically deleted... it's too quirky. – Matthieu M. Sep 28 '12 at 15:28

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