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I have a class in my library which I want to expose to the users. I don't want to expose the whole class as I might want to make a binary in-compatible changes later. I am confused with which of the following ways would be best.

//case1:
struct Impl1;
struct Handle1
{
// The definition will not be inline and will be defined in a C file
// Showing here for simplicity
  void interface() 
  {
    static_cast<Impl1*>(this)->interface();
  }
}    
struct Impl1 : public Handle1
{
  void interface(){/*do Actual work*/}
  private:
  int _data;// and other private data
};

//case2:    
struct Impl2
struct Handle2
{
  //constructor/destructor to manage impl
  void interface() // will not be inline as above.
  {
    _impl->interface();
  }
  private:
  Impl2* _impl;
}

struct Impl2
{
  void interface(){/*do Actual work*/}
  private:
  int _data;// and other private data
};

Handle class is only for exposing functionality. They will be created and managed only inside the library. Inheritance is just for abstracting implementation details.There wont be multiple/different impl classes. In terms of performance, I think both will be identical. Is it? I am thinking of going with case1 approach. Are there any issues needs to be taken care?

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"I have a class in my library which I want to expose to the users" - I think you should rephrase that :-> –  Ed Heal Sep 28 '12 at 10:52
2  
Sounds like you are after the PIMPL compilation firewall idiom: herbsutter.com/gotw/_101 –  111111 Sep 28 '12 at 10:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're second approach looks very much like the compilation firewall idiom (sometimes known as the pimpl idiom). The only difference is that in the compilation firewall idiom, the implementation class is usually (but not always) defined as a member. Don't forget the constructor (which allocates the Impl) and the destructor (which frees it). Along with the copy constructor and assignment operator.

The first approach also works, but will require factory functions to create the objects. When I've used it, I've simply made all of the functions in the Handle pure virtual, and let the client code call them directly. In this case, since client code actually has pointers to your object (in the compilation firewall idiom, the only pointers are in the Handle class itself), the client will have to worry about memory management; if no cycles are possible, this is one case where shared_ptr makes a lot of sense. (The factory function can return a shared_ptr, for example, and client code may never see a raw pointer.)

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I would recommend that factory return a unique_ptr by default. Memory Leak Free and Overhead Free. –  Matthieu M. Sep 28 '12 at 11:35
    
That's also an alternative. Traditionally the favored alternative (but with auto_ptr), since it doesn't commit the client to a specific smart pointer: you can construct a shared_ptr from a unique_ptr, but not vice versa. In this particular case, I'm not sure that the added flexibility buys you anything. –  James Kanze Sep 28 '12 at 12:57

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