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A little background: I'm a WPF to WinForms convertee and for some time I've been migrating my application.

I was reported by a friend that my code doesn't work on Windows XP (it generates a stack overflow at startup) even though it works fine on Windows 7 (which I develop in).

After a little research, what caused the problem was something along these lines:

 private void listView1_SelectedIndexChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
 {
     listView1.SelectedIndices.Clear();
     listView1.Items[0].Selected = true;
 }

Now that I noticed the obviously poor decision, I wasn't wondering why it doesn't work on Windows XP. I was wondering why does it work on Windows 7.

Obviously at some point the compiler figures out what I'm trying to do and prevents the same event to be fired over and over again, but I'd much rather have it do nothing, so I can see and squish the bug on sight on the platform I'm developing in, rather than have to test it under two platforms simultaneously. Back in WPF I could handle such behaviour manually by setting e.Handled to 'true', in WinForms apparently there's no such thing.

Is there some sort of a compiler flag for this?

share|improve this question
    
You'll have to roll your own flag AFAIK –  lc. Sep 28 '12 at 11:00
4  
I have never heard of any one migrating from WPF -> WinForms! FairPlay. –  Killercam Sep 28 '12 at 11:00
    
What version of .NET are you running against? There are some bugs in 4.0 fixed by installing 4.5 on W7, but you can't do the same on XP. (I doubt this is it but you never know.) –  Rawling Sep 28 '12 at 11:03
1  
Why on earth would someone go from WPF to Winforms? –  PhonicUK Sep 28 '12 at 11:04
1  
@Killercam lol I took 2 years to migrate from WinForms to WPF its so damn complicated but you know progress bars in comboboxes make it so cool –  EaterOfCode Sep 28 '12 at 11:16
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try this:

private void listView1_SelectedIndexChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
   if (!listView1.Items[0].Selected) {
       listView1.SelectedIndices.Clear();
       listView1.Items[0].Selected = true;
   }
}

You only want to SET selection ONCE, on your first item. The problem is it's likely getting into a perpetual loop.

As to why Windows 7 is more forgiving than XP I couldn't say. Could be the order the LVM_* messages are processed in or anything.

share|improve this answer
    
your answer is right but my answer is much cooler :P –  EaterOfCode Sep 28 '12 at 11:12
    
Yeh but adding/removing the events is a bit expensive/extreme :) –  Lloyd Sep 28 '12 at 11:13
    
I know but its something new for much people and I didn't thought it of that way –  EaterOfCode Sep 28 '12 at 11:15
    
I guess this workaround is as straight-forward as you can get :) That said, I already knew why the bug occured. I was only worried about the different behaviour part. –  Kuraj Sep 28 '12 at 11:20
    
becuase XP always fires? –  EaterOfCode Sep 28 '12 at 11:41
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Check and see if the .NET version makes any difference. If you have a newer version of .NET on your Windows 7 machine than on XP (very likely), then it is possible for there to be differences even if you are targeting the earlier version.

See what MSDN says about .NET backwards compatibility.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the article. –  Kuraj Sep 28 '12 at 11:26
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this may work (NOT TESTED)

private void listView1_SelectedIndexChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
   if(Environment.OSVersion.Version.Major < 6) listview1.SelectedIndexChanged -= new EventHandler(listView1_SelectedIndexChanged);
   listView1.SelectedIndices.Clear();
   listView1.Items[0].Selected = true;
   if(Environment.OSVersion.Version.Major < 6) listview1.SelectedIndexChanged += new EventHandler(listView1_SelectedIndexChanged);
}

edit look its OS specific :o

share|improve this answer
    
Haha. This makes the XP one behave just like the 7 one did, but now the 7 one behaves even more differently. What exactly is the deal here... :) –  Kuraj Sep 28 '12 at 11:08
    
@Kuraj did a edit check it out :P –  EaterOfCode Sep 28 '12 at 11:12
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