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I have a question about how to mock some calls in java, for example, imagine that I have this:

import whatever.package;

Class myClass extends otherClass {

    public void myMethod() {
        ...
        int a = methodCall();
        ...
    }
}

The problem is that "methodCall()" comes from the package "whatever.package" and it's being inherited from "otherClass". Is it possible to mock it so it returns whatever int I want?

Thanks so much!!

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What have you tried ? –  Brian Agnew Sep 28 '12 at 11:00
    
So methodCall is in the same class? –  jalynn2 Sep 28 '12 at 11:01
    
What do mean by "comes from the package" ? Is it a static member of myClass or some other class? Or a non-static member of myClass? –  Fildor Sep 28 '12 at 11:06
    
So methodCall() is from another package, ergo it is a part of another object/class. But you use it as if its a method of myClass. So which one is it? It could be static, but it doesnt have to. ..Indicate all that in your example code, its quite important for the question. If you dont, its like asking "ive got a car, it has some parts, like an engine and gearbox, and it doesnt work, how do i fix?" –  K.L. Sep 28 '12 at 11:29
1  
definitely need to know if it's static or not. Also, if it's non-static, where is the object instantiated? Is it a class-level object, or specific to your method? –  JoshC13 Sep 28 '12 at 11:41

2 Answers 2

After the clarification in comments

If its inherited, you can use the last pattern i proposed (test extends myClass) and simply override the methodCall()


In this answer i assume that methodCall() is a non-static method of another class you own.

lets modify the example code:

import whatever.package;

Class myClass 
{
    public void myMethod() 
    {
        ...
        anotherClass aClass = new anotherClass();
        int a = aClass.methodCall();
        ...
    }
}

So, now we want to mock out the anotherClass's methodCall().

The normal procedure is to use interfaces and push out the "wiring" up somewhere else, to avoid tight coupling. Make some research on Dependancy Injection and similar concepts.

In short, using new anotherClass() creates the tight coupling. You could have the anotherClass object injected in myClass constructor or through getters and setters. I assume you need the mocking out for writing unit tests. Consider the following code:

import whatever.package;

Class myClass 
{
    private IanotherClass another;

    public void SetAnotherClass(IAnotherClass aClass)
    {
         another = aClass;
    }

    public void myMethod() 
    {
        ...
         int a = another.methodCall();
        ...
    }
}

Test code:

   myClass testedClass = new myClass();
   testedClass.SetAnotherClass(new MyAnotherClassMock());
   testedClass.myMethod();

As for injecting dependancies and programming against interfaces, not implementations, theres a lot to be read on the topic - just google it!

If you dont want to redesign your whole code and just need a quick (and a bit dirty) fix, you may consider moving creating the anotherClass instances into separate methods and then simply have your test classes inherit from your class, overwriting mentioned methods (this isnt always possible - all depends on your actual code)

example:

Class myClass 
{
    public void myMethod() 
    {
        ...
        IanotherClass aClass = GetAnotherClassInstance();
        int a = aClass.methodCall();
        ...
    }

    protected IanotherClass GetAnotherClassInstance()
    {
        return new anotherClass();
    }
}

Class MyTestClass extends myClass
{
   @overwrite
   protected IanotherClass GetAnotherClassInstance()
   {
        return new anotherClassMock();
   }
}

Then just use myTestClass for your test!

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Yes, I didn't want to change my code in order to test it, but it seems I will have to eventually :) Thanks for your answer! –  Piripo Sep 28 '12 at 12:43

Without redesign of your code?

Mock the methodCall's class and push it up in the classpathorder.

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How to push it up in the classpathorder? –  chyx Sep 28 '12 at 11:35
    
what a IDE do you use? –  Peter Rader Sep 28 '12 at 11:35
    
I mean command line argument to javac. I'm just curious. –  chyx Sep 28 '12 at 11:36
    
not sure, try to copy the class to the system-classpath should work in your case i.e. c:/progr/java/jdk13456/jre/lib/rt.jar. –  Peter Rader Sep 28 '12 at 11:38
    
dont forget to remove the class from rt.jar after mocktest –  Peter Rader Sep 28 '12 at 11:39

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