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Given (particularly) the following scenario:

  • One thread per core,
  • Each core having its own distinct cache,
  • Programs where cache hit/miss ratios are central to good performance (i.e. most today)

I've read frequently about the benefits of thread pooling for scheduling work in multicore systems. Although there are a number of approaches to multithreading, the comparison is often made between a smarter, load-balancing approach like this, and a more naive, "assign threads by task type" approach where load-balancing is assumed to have been handled at development time, rather than by the system itself at runtime. An example of this might be dedicated number crunching on one thread and rendering tasks on another.

It seems to me that under the above conditions, the thread-by-task-type approach could lead to far better performance since that core's local cache would be that much more efficient for the specific task to which it has been assigned? (Assuming that waiting is not much of an issue, i.e. both threads are running at or close to full steam.)

I also wonder what performance impact thread-safety mechanisms might have, in load-balanced vs naive approaches.

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See this question for more info on how this is perceived in my subfield. Scaleability is a concern, as is too much idling on individual threads. But I would like opinions from outside the games field. – Arcane Engineer Sep 28 '12 at 12:27
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seems to me that under the above conditions, the thread-by-task-type approach could lead to far better performance since that core's local cache would be that much more efficient for the specific task to which it has been assigned

The biggest performance gain with threaded programming is not about the type of task that is forked off but rather how asynchronous its operation is. If the task is tied closely with shared resources meaning that it has to lock and synchronize memory often, then you are not going to get the benefits of the cache memory on the separate processors.

Edit: I now see where you are going Nick. A load-balancing system is by definition, consuming from some common task queue so may have more synchronization points. However, disparate tasks may be dealing with the database or writing to the file-system and blocking on other resources that hamper its ability to run asynchronously. And even though a load-balancing approach might need more synchronization, it can be the easiest way to significantly improve the throughput of your application.

I also wonder what performance impact thread-safety mechanisms might have, in load-balanced vs naive approaches.

Right. This is the critical point. Thread-safety implies synchronization or other locking as well as writing dirty memory to central storage, and invalidating cache memory that has been updated by other threads. The more a threaded task has to perform such operations, the more its performance will suffer.

Again, this is not necessarily about the type of task, load-balancing versus task-type, but about the specifics of the code necessary to perform the tasks.

Lastly, it is important to realize that for most threaded programs, you will have more threads than CPU/cores -- especially considering that there is often background GC, finalizer, and other VM threads (assuming you are on a VM) competing for CPU resources. This makes it even more difficult to optimize a threaded program to make use of thread-to-CPU affinity which seems to be implied in your question.

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Hehe. How on earth did you know I was using Java... out of my entire repertoire. Nice. – Arcane Engineer Sep 28 '12 at 11:59
1  
Ooops. I made that assumption @Nick. I've edited my answer to show that it is/was an assumption. :-) – Gray Sep 28 '12 at 12:02
    
I'm taking a lot from this answer so far, but I would like to ask re your comment, "Again, this is not necessarily about the type of task, load-balancing versus task-type, but about the specifics of the code necessary to perform the tasks." I'm not sure how this can be. With the naive approach, we simply don't need as much safety, do we? Say for instance the number crunching in my example sets up the data model, and the rendering only ever reads from that data model. Doesn't this imply the need for fewer synchronisation / safety mechanisms, and contribute in that way to performance? – Arcane Engineer Sep 28 '12 at 12:03
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It does @Nick if you put it that way, yes. I'm going to edit my answer to add more qualified agreement. My only point is that although in one program, a task might be like you said, in other programs, a task may be updating the database or writing to disk and competing with other threads for resources. So even though it is not a "load-balancing" type of scenario, it is still blocking. – Gray Sep 28 '12 at 12:10
    
Yes, I'm fully with you there. Thanks! – Arcane Engineer Sep 28 '12 at 12:12

It seems to me that under the above conditions, the thread-by-task-type approach could lead to far better performance [...]

It seems you comparing apples to oranges a bit here. Clearly if you have several different tasks that are separate and have distinct execution patterns, starting one thread per such task type is the best approach. Thread pools are not for this kind of work, they are for identical tasks that don't care which thread executes them, which is their biggest advantage.

Now, you must make the distinction between thread pooling at the application level and thread pooling at the OS level. At the app level you want to have tasks executed anonymously by threads to ensure load-balancing. That's perfectly desirable. But at the OS level, threads are mapped to cores, but the OS usually keeps them on the initial core for the duration of their execution, i.e. core load-balancing is not as aggressive as application load-balancing specifically due to the caching issues.

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Have you ever tried using a thread pool for such as this? In my field (games), it is seen as best practice -- for scaleability reasons -- to avoid the naive approach. – Arcane Engineer Sep 28 '12 at 12:10
    
@Nick Wiggill: Sorry, but which is the naive approach? The thread-per-task one? – Tudor Sep 28 '12 at 12:13
    
Yep, that's the one. The non-thread-pooling one. – Arcane Engineer Sep 28 '12 at 12:13
    
@Nick Wiggill: Reading from the link you posted, I assume the discussion is about having a logic thread that is supposed to pass data to a separate rendering thread right? – Tudor Sep 28 '12 at 12:20
    
It's not just that. It's all the game's subsystems. But to address only the major ones: Game Logic, AI (which can be broader-scale than immediate game logic, i.e. it may take more than a single update to complete an AI step), Rendering, IO. Essentially, I think that while you've said the biggest advantage to thread pools is for identical tasks, and my initial thought would agree with that (hence my question on cache), I am actually not nearly as sure as you are that this is so clear-cut. I have always thought that the biggest advantage to thread pools is getting the most out of many cores. – Arcane Engineer Sep 28 '12 at 12:23

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