Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Does host wait for device to finish its execution compeletely? e.g. the program has the structure as follows

// cpu code segment

// data transfer from host to device

QUESTION - WILL CPU WAIT FOR DEVICE TO FINISH TRANSFER? IF NO, IS IT POSSIBLE? IF YES, HOW?

// kernel launch

QUESTION - WILL CPU WAIT FOR DEVICE TO LET IT FINISH KERNEL EXECUTION (CONSIDERING KERNEL EXECUTION WILL TAKE NOTABLE TIME say-5 sec)? IF NO, IS IT POSSIBLE? IF YES, HOW?

// data transfer from device to host

// program terminates after printing some information 
share|improve this question
    
@Spontifixus, isn't it clear? I am wondering the same as OP did. –  Primož 'c0dehunter' Kralj Jun 1 '13 at 18:28
    
@Primož'c0dehunter'Kralj You're right. The question is just badly formatted. –  Spontifixus Jun 3 '13 at 7:50

1 Answer 1

The synchronization functions of the CUDA run-time can let you achieve what you want.

cudaDeviceSynchronize():

When you call this function, the CPU will wait until the device has completed ALL its work, whether it is memory copy or kernel execution.

cudaStreamSynchronize(cudaStream):

This function will block the CPU until the specified CUDA stream has finished its execution. Other CUDA streams will continue their execution asynchronously.

share|improve this answer
3  
To expand on this, there are two questions: 1) for the data transfer the CPU will block and wait for the transfer to complete if you use cudaMemcpy() - if you use the asynchronous versions (cudaMemcpyAsync()) then it is asynchronous and the CPU will not block (obviously); 2) kernel launches are always asynchronous as described in the programming guide - synchronising after kernel call (using cudaDeviceSynchronize() (or stream equivalent) or calling a synchronous memcpy will cause the CPU to block. –  Tom Sep 28 '12 at 14:57
1  
Also remember that if you're using the GPU then ideally you would copy data and execute kernels asynchronously - may as well make good use of all the engines at your disposal! –  Tom Sep 28 '12 at 16:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.