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After using cygwin's ssh to login from windows to linux-hosts, when exiting the remote shell, I always get the annoying msg:

"Killed by signal 1"

I googled, and realize its harmless, but still annoying... Some suggested you can get rid of the message by using

$ ssh -q ...

But that has no effect on any of the machines I've tried.

Anyone knows a working solution to get rid of this msg?

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Did you find a solution for this? –  Yotam Feb 23 '13 at 21:32
    
Nope. Still getting that msg. –  Rop Feb 24 '13 at 19:48
    
@Yotam check out my answer –  Irfy Mar 9 '14 at 20:41

2 Answers 2

This happens when you proxy your ssh session through another host. Example .ssh/config file:

# machine with open SSH port
Host proxy
HostName foo.com

# machine accessible only from the above machine
Host target
HostName 192.168.0.12
ProxyCommand ssh proxy nc %h %p

When you exit from an ssh target, the ssh in ProxyCommand will cause the output. If you add the -q there, it will be suppressed:

ProxyCommand ssh -q proxy nc %h %p

You may be surprised that this output has nothing to do with Cygwin -- it happens on Linux as well.

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alternatively, use ProxyCommand ssh -q -W %h:%p <jumper> –  Nybble Sep 2 '14 at 19:31
    
One one of my older SunOS still-in-production boxes, OpenSSH_4.3p2, OpenSSL 0.9.8b 04 May 2006 doesn't support this option. Also, -W has nothing to do with the original problem. –  Irfy Sep 3 '14 at 13:29

Perhaps, you might like PuTTY as an alternative. I don't think it gives that error AND it allows you to do things like save connection info as well as other niceties.

Though I haven't tried it, you might also be able to redirect sterr (which is the stream I believe that message would be sent to) to /dev/null (effectively, the bitbucket or bottomless void where things go to die). You could do possibly do something like:

ssh user@host 2>/dev/null

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