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I'm write some text a file then delete it, but the deletion is failed.

The code is very simple:

import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileOutputStream;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.OutputStream;

public class TestFile {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
        File file = new File("c:\\abc.txt");
        writeFile(file, "hello");

        // delete the file
        boolean deleted = file.delete();
        System.out.println("Deleted? " + deleted);

    }

    public static void writeFile(File file, String content) throws IOException {
        OutputStream out = null;
        try {
            out = new FileOutputStream(file);
            out.write(content.getBytes("UTF-8"));
        } catch (IOException e) {
            try {
                out.close();
            } catch (IOException e1) {
                // ignored
            }
        }
    }
}

The output is:

Deleted? false

And there is a file abc.txt contains hello still there under c:.

Then I use FileUtils.writeStringToFile(...) from commons-io.jar instead, the file will be deleted.

But I don't know where is wrong with my code, please help me to find it out.

share|improve this question
    
Thanks for all... This is really a stupid question, that I always wrote the close() in finally, but today I wrote it in catch and I did't realize it :( –  Freewind Sep 28 '12 at 13:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You are only closing the file if you get an IOException.

Change it to a finally block and you will be able to close and delete the file.

public static void writeFile(File file, String content) throws IOException {
    OutputStream out = new FileOutputStream(file);
    try {
        out.write(content.getBytes("UTF-8"));
    } finally {
        try {
            out.close();
        } catch (IOException ignored) {
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You need to close your OutputStream when you finished writing the file.

try {
        out = new FileOutputStream(file);
        out.write(content.getBytes("UTF-8"));
        out.close();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        try {
            out.close();
        } catch (IOException e1) {
            // ignored
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

In your main method,

 public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
        File file = new File("c:\\abc.txt");
        writeFile(file, "hello");

        // delete the file
        boolean deleted = file.delete();
        System.out.println("Deleted? " + deleted);

    }

You open the file, write to it and then do not close it. Java keeps the file open for you, so if you wanted to add more information to it, you could. However, to be able to delete the file, you need to make sure no other reference is open to it. You can do this by using file.close() to close the file handle Java reserves for you.

It's best practice to always close a stream when you are done with it, especially if you added data to it. Otherwise, you might run into situations where you are keepings files open by accident, or, in extreme cases, lose data you thought was saved already.

share|improve this answer

Have a look at what FileUtils.writeStringToFile() does that you haven't.

public static void writeStringToFile(File file, String data, String encoding) throws IOException {
    OutputStream out = new java.io.FileOutputStream(file);
    try {
        out.write(data.getBytes(encoding));
    } finally {
        IOUtils.closeQuietly(out);
    }
}

You will note that the out stream is always closed, wheras in your example it only gets closed in your catch block if the write() throws an exception.

On Windows, files that are open by any program cannot be deleted.

share|improve this answer

You just delete your file if an exception occurs. You need to do that every time, after you opened the file. You may want to put close into a finally block.

If you're using Java 7 I consider using a try-with-ressources block, which takes care of closing files for you.

try (BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(path))) 
{
    return br.readLine();
}
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