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This is my query:

Select COUNT(*) 
From 
    Users u
    Inner Join 
    UsersLoginHistory uh On u.UserID = uh.UserID 
Where 
    1 = 1   
    And 
    u.AccountID = 37 
Group By u.UserID

What I'd like to be able to get is Count(*) should be returning a number after grouping on u.UserId. But it returns the Count(*) before the group by is made.

So I can rewrite the above query as:

Select COUNT(*)
From (
    Select   u.Username   
    From 
        Users u
        Inner Join 
        UsersLoginHistory uh On u.UserID = uh.UserID 
    Where 
        1 = 1   
        And 
        u.AccountID = 37 
    Group By u.UserID
) v

But I need to find out why is the Count(*) returning records before a group by is made and how can I fix the 1st query itself.

EDIT: Sample Records

Users table

UserId     Username
102        tom.kaufmann

UserLoginHistory table

UsersLoginHistoryID UserID  LoginDateTime         LogoutDateTime         IPAddress
1                    102    2012-09-28 01:16:00 NULL                 115.118.71.248
2                    102    2012-09-28 01:29:00 2012-09-28 01:29:00  127.0.0.1
3                    102    2012-09-28 01:32:00 2012-09-28 01:32:00  127.0.0.1
4                    102    2012-09-28 01:41:00 NULL                 115.118.71.248
5                    102    2012-09-28 01:43:00 2012-09-28 07:04:00  115.118.71.248  

and so on..

Haven't writted every single record in this DB.

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2  
Please post example data that reproduces the issue. Your first query should work. Your second query returns the number of groups. –  Martin Smith Sep 28 '12 at 13:54
    
@Martin: Sample records are now there. –  Jack Sep 28 '12 at 14:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Based on your second query which you say returns the desired results (and assuming UserID is the PK of Users) I presume this is what you need

SELECT Count(UserID)
FROM   Users u
WHERE  u.AccountID = 37
       AND EXISTS (SELECT *
                   FROM   UsersLoginHistory uh
                   WHERE  u.UserID = uh.UserID)

This will be more efficient than expanding out all the joined rows then collapsing them again with Group By u.UserID and counting the number of rows that result.

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Can you please suggest why would my 1st query not work? Shouldn't Count(*) return the number of rows after grouping? –  Jack Sep 28 '12 at 14:10
1  
@Jack - COUNT .... GROUP BY returns the count for each individual group. It tells you for each UserID how many logins they have made. –  Martin Smith Sep 28 '12 at 14:11
    
Thanks. It is obvious. I don't know what made me think the way I thought before! However my next question is, I am using one automated class to build me a paged query because I need to know the total items present in any given resultset and it has to be generic. I just want to know if I write the count query as my 2nd query in question and I have 1 million records, would that be really slow? I mean, would expanding all rows create a huge cost? –  Jack Sep 28 '12 at 14:27
    
It could do. Depends how many login details there are for each user on average. The EXISTS method just checks to see that there is at least one then stops processing it. –  Martin Smith Sep 28 '12 at 14:35
    
OK. Thanks Martin –  Jack Sep 28 '12 at 14:43

Change the first line to:

Select COUNT(*), u.UserID
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This still doesn't work. I get 102, 11. 11 is the count it is returning. I want to get the total number of rows after grouping on u.UserID and the real count is just 1. Where it is returning 11 which the number of records present in userloginhistory table. –  Jack Sep 28 '12 at 14:06

This should provide you a list of UserIds and the count of entries in the UsersLoginHistory table.

SELECT u.UserId
, COUNT(uh.*)
FROM Users u
INNER JOIN UsersLoginHistory uh ON u.UserID = uh.UserID
WHERE u.AccountID = 37
GROUP BY u.UserID
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But I need to find out why is the Count(*) returning records before a group by is made and how can I fix the 1st query itself

It is counting the number of lines for each UserID (number of logins), which is exactly how group by is supposed to work.

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COUNT is an aggregate function and this is how it's supposed to work. You get count per grouping.

In your first query you are querying the number of userloginhistory per user. In your second query you are querying number of users with login history.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173454.aspx

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