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I'am trying to sort a dataframe by column using df.sort_index. Such strings column, the second, is composed by numbers within text. After operation I've got:

15 rs1820451 32681212 0.441 0.493 0.5358 98.9 29 0 0.441 T:A 
14 rs1820450 32680556 0.441 0.493 0.5358 98.9 29 0 0.441 G:C 
38 rs1820447 32693541 0.421 0.332 0.0915 94.4 26 0 0.211 G:A 
37 rs1820446 32693440 0.483 0.499 0.9633 100.0 30 0 0.475 G:T 
7 rs1808502 32660555 0.517 0.46 0.543 100.0 30 0 0.358 C:G 
24 rs17817908 32687035 0.407 0.362 0.6159 98.9 29 0 0.237 C:T 
22 rs17817896 32686160 0.407 0.362 0.6159 98.9 29 0 0.237 T:A 
66 rs17236946 32717247 0.492 0.453 0.7762 98.9 29 0 0.347 T:C

Which isn't exactly what I want. The last three lines should be in the beginning. Is there any other dataframe method or an overcome to this?

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4 Answers 4

If you want to sort on a column or multiple columns you need to use df.sort(), df.sort_index() sorts on the index only.

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outdata.sort(columns='Name', ascending=True, axis=0), unless I'm doing something wrong, it still doesn't work. –  fred Sep 28 '12 at 14:33

This has no error checking or optimisation at all, but is this what you want:

def sort_on(lines, col_idx):
  return sorted(lines, key=lambda l: float(l.split()[col_idx]))

lines = """\
15 rs1820451 32681212 0.441 0.493 0.5358 98.9 29 0 0.441 T:A 
14 rs1820450 32680556 0.441 0.493 0.5358 98.9 29 0 0.441 G:C 
38 rs1820447 32693541 0.421 0.332 0.0915 94.4 26 0 0.211 G:A 
37 rs1820446 32693440 0.483 0.499 0.9633 100.0 30 0 0.475 G:T 
7 rs1808502 32660555 0.517 0.46 0.543 100.0 30 0 0.358 C:G 
24 rs17817908 32687035 0.407 0.362 0.6159 98.9 29 0 0.237 C:T 
22 rs17817896 32686160 0.407 0.362 0.6159 98.9 29 0 0.237 T:A 
66 rs17236946 32717247 0.492 0.453 0.7762 98.9 29 0 0.347 T:C
""".splitlines()

sorted_lines = sort_on(lines, 3)
print "\n".join(sorted_lines)
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Hi spiralx, thanks for helping. It works but it isn't a feasible solution. This way a would have to pass my entire dataframe to a string. –  fred Sep 28 '12 at 14:23
    
I can't see any obvious method other than subclassing DataFrame and overloading DataFrame.iteritems, or using DataFrame.apply to get a new df with the numeric values extracted. That, or generate the object with a different column structure to start with, might be the easiest. –  spiralx Sep 28 '12 at 15:07

Unless I made a mistake, it still doesn't work.

outsorted = outdata.sort(columns='Name', ascending=False, axis=0)

38 rs1820447 32693541 0.421 0.332 0.0915 94.4 26 0 0.211 G:A 
37 rs1820446 32693440 0.483 0.499 0.9633 100.0 30 0 0.475 G:T 
7 rs1808502 32660555 0.517 0.46 0.543 100.0 30 0 0.358 C:G 
24 rs17817908 32687035 0.407 0.362 0.6159 98.9 29 0 0.237 C:T 
22 rs17817896 32686160 0.407 0.362 0.6159 98.9 29 0 0.237 T:A 
66 rs17236946 32717247 0.492 0.453 0.7762 98.9 29 0 0.347 T:C 
39 rs17236939 32694770 0.483 0.499 0.9633 100.0 30 0 0.475 C:G
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Which of these columns is the 'Name' one? –  Wouter Overmeire Sep 28 '12 at 15:48
    
The second one. –  fred Sep 28 '12 at 18:00
    
Why is this output wrong? You're sorting it in descending order no? –  Chang She Sep 30 '12 at 0:44
    
@ Chang She: df has been sorted in a descending order according to the second column. So, the last 4 rows would come first. This looks like a bug. A convenient way to sort Strings would follow the version sorting (see linux command sort --version-sort) –  fred Oct 1 '12 at 12:04
up vote 0 down vote accepted

For futures references, here goes a possible solution.

    cond = ((df['L1'] != rscode) & (df['L2'] != rscode))
    outname = inf + '_test'
    df['L3'] = df['L1'].map(lambda x: int(str(x)[2:]))        
    outdata = df.drop(df[cond].index.values).sort(columns='L3', ascending=False, axis=0)
    # export outdata using Datadrame.to_csv with the original df cols

Improvements are welcome. Best,

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