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Here's the code example :

Try
    Throw New FirstException()
Finally
    Throw New SecondException()
End Try

I figured out it only throws SecondException out and FirstException just vanishes.

I thought FirstException would be inside InnerException property of SecondException but it appears it is not.

I'm not blocked on anything as I don't really need the FirstException to show up, I'm just rather intrigued about this behaviour.

  • Is there a way to know SecondException did get thrown first when catching it all at upper level ?

  • If the first exception really is overriden by the second, what is the reason ?

  • Does it happen in every other language ? Is it logical ?

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2  
    
Answered my first question, thanks. I still have no idea why it does happen that way though, is this a common and well known way to handle multiple throws and there's no real explanation ? –  Florian F. Sep 28 '12 at 14:40
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

One of the limitations of exception handling in .net is that there is no nice way for code in a Finally block to know what exception, if any, caused the code in the Try block to exit, nor is there any normal way for code in a finally block which does have such information to make it available to code which might throw an exception.

In vb.net, it's possible to kludge things in a manner that works pretty well, even though it looks a bit ugly.

Module ExceptionDemo
    Function CopySecondArgToFirstAndReturnFalse(Of T)(ByRef dest As T, src As T) As Boolean
        dest = src
        Return False
    End Function
    Function AnnotateExceptionAndReturnFalse(ex As Exception, TryBlockException As Exception) As Boolean
        If ex Is Nothing Then Return False ' Should never occur
        If TryBlockException Is Nothing Then Return False ' No annotation is required
        ex.Data("TryBlockException") = TryBlockException
        Return False
    End Function

    Sub ExceptionTest(MainAction As Action, CleanupAction As Action)
        Dim TryBlockException As Exception = Nothing
        Try
            MainAction()
        Catch ex As Exception When CopySecondArgToFirstAndReturnFalse(TryBlockException, ex)
            ' This block never executes, but above grabs a ref to any exception that occurs
        Finally
            Try
                CleanupAction()
            Catch ex As Exception When AnnotateExceptionAndReturnFalse(ex, TryBlockException)
                ' This block never executes, but above performs necessary annotations
            End Try
        End Try
    End Sub

    Sub ExceptionTest2(Message As String, MainAction As Action, CleanupAction As Action)
        Debug.Print("Exception test: {0}", Message)
        Try
            ExceptionTest(MainAction, CleanupAction)
        Catch ex As Exception
            Dim TryBlockException As Exception = Nothing
            Debug.Print("Exception occurred:{0}", ex.ToString)
            If ex.Data.Contains("TryBlockException") Then TryBlockException = TryCast(ex.Data("TryBlockException"), Exception)
            If TryBlockException IsNot Nothing Then Debug.Print("TryBlockException was:{0}", TryBlockException.ToString)
        End Try
        Debug.Print("End test: {0}", Message)
    End Sub
    Sub ExceptionDemo()
        Dim SuccessfulAction As Action = Sub()
                                             Debug.Print("Successful action")
                                         End Sub
        Dim SuccessfulCleanup As Action = Sub()
                                              Debug.Print("Cleanup is successful")
                                          End Sub
        Dim ThrowingAction As Action = Sub()
                                           Debug.Print("Throwing in action")
                                           Throw New InvalidOperationException("Can't make two plus two equal seven")
                                       End Sub
        Dim ThrowingCleanup As Action = Sub()
                                            Debug.Print("Throwing in cleanup")
                                            Throw New ArgumentException("That's not an argument--that's just contradiction")
                                        End Sub
        ExceptionTest2("Non-exception case", SuccessfulAction, SuccessfulCleanup)
        ExceptionTest2("Exception in main; none in cleanup", ThrowingAction, SuccessfulCleanup)
        ExceptionTest2("Exception in cleanup only", SuccessfulAction, ThrowingCleanup)
        ExceptionTest2("Exception in main and cleanup", ThrowingAction, ThrowingCleanup)
    End Sub
End Module

The module above starts with a couple helper modules which should probably be in their own "Exception helpers" module. The ExceptionTest method shows the pattern for code which might throw an exception in both the Try and Finally block. The ExceptionTest2 method calls ExceptionTest and reports what exception if any comes back from it. ExceptionDemo calls ExceptionTest2 in such a way as to cause exceptions in different combinations of the Try and Finally blocks.

As shown, if an exception occurs during cleanup, that exception will be returned to the caller, with the original exception being an item in its Data dictionary. An alternative pattern would be to catch the exception that occurs on cleanup and include it in the data of the original exception (which would be left uncaught). My general inclination is that it's probably better in many cases to propagate the exception that occurs during cleanup, since any code which was planning to deal with the original exception will probably expect that cleanup succeeded; if such an expectation cannot be met, the exception that escapes should probably not be the one the caller was expecting. Note also that the latter approach would require a slightly different method of adding information to the original exception, since an exception which is thrown in a nested Try block might need to hold information about multiple exceptions that were thrown in nested Finally blocks.

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I guess the primary explanation for why this works this way is that you are never catching your first exception and passing it along the chain. If you have a situation like the above where you may be throwing several exceptions on the way back to the original caller then you have to either catch them as they are thrown (and include them as an inner exception when creating the next one) :

Dim ex1 As Exception = Nothing
Try
    Throw New Exception("first exception")
Catch ex As Exception
    ex1 = ex
Finally
    Throw New Exception("second exception", ex1)
End Try

Or, probably better - just don't throw until you have all of the exceptions figured out:

Dim ex1 As Exception = Nothing
Try
    ex1 = New Exception("first exception")
Finally
    Throw New Exception("second exception", ex1)
End Try

Throwing and catching exceptions is expensive, so it's probably best to not throw until you're ready to return and just log along the way.

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