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I have the following code in my application which does two things:

Parse the file which has 'n' number of data.

For each data in the file, there will be two web service calls.

 public static List<String> parseFile(String fileName) {
   List<String> idList = new ArrayList<String>();
   try {
     BufferedReader cfgFile = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(new File(fileName)));
     String line = null;
     cfgFile.readLine();
     while ((line = cfgFile.readLine()) != null) {
       if (!line.trim().equals("")) {
         String [] fields = line.split("\\|"); 
         idList.add(fields[0]);
       } 
     } 
     cfgFile.close();
   } catch (IOException e) {
     System.out.println(e+" Unexpected File IO Error.");
   }
 return idList;
}

When i try parse the file having 1 million lines of record, the java process fails after processing certain amount of data. I got java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: Java heap space error. I can partly figure out that the java process stops because of this huge data being provided. Kindly suggest me how to proceed with this huge data.

EDIT: Will this part of code new BufferedReader(new FileReader(new File(fileName))); parse the whole file and gets affected to the size of the file.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem you have is you are accumulating all the data on the list. The best way to approach this is to do it on a streaming fashion. This means do not accumulate all the ids on the list, but call your web service on each row or accumulate a smaller buffer and then do the call.

Opening the file and creating the BufferedReader will have no impact on memory consumption, as the bytes from the file will be read (more or less) line by line. The problem is at this point in the code idList.add(fields[0]);, the list will grow as large as the file as you keep accumulating all of the file data into it.

Your code should do something like this:

 while ((line = cfgFile.readLine()) != null) {
   if (!line.trim().equals("")) {
     String [] fields = line.split("\\|"); 
     callToRemoteWebService(fields[0]);
   } 
 } 
share|improve this answer
    
can you please paste your ideas for the edit I made in my question. –  Arun Sep 28 '12 at 14:41
    
okie thanks for you ideas. –  Arun Sep 28 '12 at 14:50
    
If you fin the answer useful please accept it. Thanks. –  Elmer Sep 28 '12 at 15:47

Increase your java heap memory size using the -Xms and -Xmx options. If not set explicitly, the jvm sets the heap size to the ergonomic defaults which in your case is not enough. Read this paper to find out more about tuning the memory in jvm: http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/tech/memorymanagement-whitepaper-1-150020.pdf

EDIT: Alternative way on doing this in a producer-consumer way to exploit parallel processing. The general idea is to create a producer thread that reads the file and queues tasks for processing and n consumer threads that consume them. A very general idea (for illustrative purposes) is the following:

// blocking queue holding the tasks to be executed
final SynchronousQueue<Callable<String[]> queue = // ...

// reads the file and submit tasks for processing
final Runnable producer = new Runnable() {
  public void run() {
     BufferedReader in = null;
     try {
         in = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(new File(fileName)));
         String line = null;
         while ((line = file.readLine()) != null) {
             if (!line.trim().equals("")) {
                 String[] fields = line.split("\\|"); 
                 // this will block if there are not available consumer threads to process it...
                 queue.put(new Callable<Void>() {
                     public Void call() {
                         process(fields);
                     }
                  });
              } 
          }
     } catch (InterruptedException e) {
         Thread.currentThread().interrupt());
     } finally {
         // close the buffered reader here...
     }
  }
}

// Consumes the tasks submitted from the producer. Consumers can be pooled
// for parallel processing.
final Runnable consumer = new Runnable() {
  public void run() {
    try {
        while (true) {
            // this method blocks if there are no items left for processing in the queue...
            Callable<Void> task = queue.take();
            taks.call();
        }
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
    }
  }
}

Of course you have to write code that manages the lifecycle of the consumer and producer threads. The right way to do this would be by implementing it using an Executor.

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Thanks for sharing your thoughts. But i am not satisfied the way my code is. Can i handle the memory management stuff from code level. Also FYI i do have privileges to change this heap memory size set in my production box. –  Arun Sep 28 '12 at 14:48
    
It's true that your code could use some refactoring to improve utilisation of memory. The idea is instead of maintaining all of your items on a list (and therefore utilising more on memory) you could considere asynchronously processing each item using the executor framework. I'll update my answer on how to do that. –  lefty Sep 28 '12 at 16:41
    
Thanks for your thoughts :) –  Arun Sep 30 '12 at 17:38
    
Is there a way to find the heap size... I want to monitor heap size after changing my code. –  Arun Oct 1 '12 at 11:21
1  
The only other way i know of if you don't want to use the gc output nor a profiler, is to use the jmap command from the shell. In order to do this you first have to find out your java application's process id by issuing the jps command (see docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/technotes/tools/share/jps.html). This command will list all jvm process ids that are currently running in your system. Once you find your applications pid you then run jmap -heap pid, where pid is your application's process id.(see docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/technotes/tools/share/jmap.html) –  lefty Oct 1 '12 at 12:08

When you want to work with big data, you have 2 choices:

  1. use a big enough heap to fit all the data. this will "work" for a while, but if your data size is unbounded, it will eventually fail.
  2. work with the data incrementally. only keep part of the data (of a bounded size) in memory at any one time. this is the ideal solution as it will scale to any amount of data.
share|improve this answer
    
IMHO i see the first option is not a solution, as i cannot increase my disk size. Currently im doing the second option mentioned. Thanks for responding.:) –  Arun Sep 28 '12 at 14:38
    
@Arun - yes, i tried to make it clear that option 1 is not really a solution. that said, i'm unsure what disk size has to do with anything...? –  jtahlborn Sep 28 '12 at 19:16
    
sorry, i meant the size of the java heap on my prod box, for which i do not have permission... –  Arun Sep 30 '12 at 17:35

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