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I have a class called Foo which has a member that is a pointer to a vector of pointers to another class called Bar. I initialise it in the constructor but I'm not sure how to deallocate it in the destructor. I'm still learning. Would appreciate your help. The reason for having this member is so that the scope persists beyond that method i.e. beyond the stack. Thanks.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

class Bar {};

class Foo {
public:
    Foo() {
        bars = new vector<Bar*>*[10];

        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            bars[i]->push_back(new Bar());
        }
    }

    ~Foo () {
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            // TODO: how to clean up bars properly?
        }
    }

private:
    vector<Bar*>** bars;
};

int main () {
    new Foo();
    return 0;
}

Update: I appreciate the feedback on all fronts. I'm new to C and C++. Basically I wanted a 2d structure as a class member that would persist for the lifetime of the class. The reason the outer structure is an array is because I know how big it needs to be. Otherwise I was previously using vector of vectors.

share|improve this question
2  
vector<Bar*> bars; will exist for the lifetime of Foo. vector<unique_ptr<Bar>> bars; or vector<shared_ptr<Bar>> bars; makes life easier again. – hmjd Sep 28 '12 at 14:22
12  
vector<Bar*>** bars; Holy cow! – chris Sep 28 '12 at 14:22
2  
@AK4749 No, if you look at how he allocates, it's not a typo. – CrazyCasta Sep 28 '12 at 14:24
1  
holy crap you're right – im so confused Sep 28 '12 at 14:24
3  
You say you want "the scope to persist beyond the method." But, bars is a private member, and you're not returning it like you might in a factory. Also, you're also trying to delete it. Could you explain what you're trying to do in a bit more detail? – Ari Sep 28 '12 at 14:34
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The number of pointers is a bit ridiculous, as all they are doing is causing confusion and leaks, as evident from non-proper initialization and the question's title. You don't actually need any pointers at all, and don't have to worry about any cleanup.

For a 2D array with the first dimension passed into the constructor, you can use a vector of vectors:

std::vector<std::vector<Bar>> bars; 

To initialize the outer vector with the passed in size, use an initializer:

Foo(size_t size) 
    : bars(size) {}

When the object is destroyed, bars and all of it elements are as well, so there's no chance of forgetting to clean up or doing so improperly.

If performance is an issue, this can be translated into a sort of Matrix2D class that acts like a 2D array, but really only has an underlying 1D array.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Chris. One last thing. I actually used this with one difference: I used Bar* and was adding objects into the vector by doing new Bar(...). How do I instantiate a Bar with constructor args in a way that doesn't give me back a pointer as in your suggestion? I'm still very new to all this. (Obviously if I was using Bar* I would have to delete them accordingly). – junkie Oct 1 '12 at 19:40
    
@junkie, If you want to push an item on the back, you can use push_back. Your way would look something like bars[0].push_back(new Bar(5));, whereas a non-pointer version might look like bars[0].push_back(Bar(5));. – chris Oct 1 '12 at 20:13

This isn't even allocated properly. You allocate an array of pointers to std::vector<Bar*>, but never any std::Vector<Bar*>.

The best thing to do is just something like std::vector<std::unique_ptr<Bar>> or even std::unique_ptr<std::vector<std::unique_ptr<Bar>>> or something like that. What you've got is just WTF.

Or std::unique_ptr<std::array<std::unique_ptr<std::vector<std::unique_ptr<Bar>>>, 10>>.This is an exact match (but self-cleaning).

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 For the kindness and delicacy of your answer. – Kretab Chabawenizc Sep 28 '12 at 14:34

EDIT: In the case of a 2D structure (and you said you know how big your 2D structure needs to be, so we'll assume that the 10 in your loops is the size of the 2D array you desire.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

class Bar {
public:
    int BarInfo;
};

class Foo {
public:
    Foo() {
        // Allocates 10 vector spots for 10 bar elements - 100 bars, 10 x 10
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            // Puts 10 bars pointer at the end;
            // Heap-allocated (dynamically), which
            // means it survives until you delete it
            // The [10] is array syntax, meaning you'll have 10 bars
            // for each bars[index] and then
            // you can access it by bars[index][0-9]
            // If you need it to be more dynamic
            // then you should try vector<vector<Bar>>
            bars.push_back(new Bar[10]);
        }
    }

    Bar* operator[] (int index) {
        return bars[index];
    }

    ~Foo () {
        // Cleanup, because you have pointers inside the vector,
        // Must be done one at a time for each element
        for (int i = 0; i < bars.size(); i++) {
            // TODO: how to clean up bars properly?
            // Each spot in the vector<> contains 10 bars,
            // so you use the array deletion
            // and not just regular 'delete'
            delete[] bars[i]; // deletes the 10 array elements
        }
    }

private:
    // vector might not be a bad idea.
    vector<Bar*> bars;
};

This is the main I have for testing the code written, and it works like you would think a 2D array should work:

int main ( int argc, char* argv[] ) {
    Foo foo;
    // Bar at 1st row, 2nd column ( row index 0, column index 1 )
    // Bar& is a reference
    Bar& bar12 = foo[0][1];
    bar12.BarInfo = 25;
    int stuffInsideBar = foo[0][1].BarInfo; // 25
    return 0;
}

I hope that helps and gets you closer to what you're doing. I've used a technique here that might go over a starters head to make the Foo class behave like you would think a 2D array would. It's called operator overloading. It's a powerful feature in C++, so once you master more basics it might be useful to you in your future projects or current one. Good luck!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

OLD ANSWER BEFORE EDIT

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

It appears you're doing far too much indirection. While another person's answer shows you how to clean up what you've managed to do, I think you could benefit from changing how exactly you're handling the class.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

class Bar {};

class Foo {
public:
    Foo() : bars() {
        // bars is no longer a pointer-to-vectors, so you can just
        // allocate it in the constructor - see bars() after Foo()
        //bars = new vector<Bar>();

        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            // Puts 1 bar pointer at the end;
            // Heap-allocated (dynamically), which
            // means it survives until you delete it
            bars.push_back(new Bar());
        }
    }

    ~Foo () {
        // Cleanup, because you have pointers inside the vector,
        // Must be done one at a time for each element
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            // TODO: how to clean up bars properly?
            // TODOING: One at a time
            delete bars[i]; // deletes pointer at i
        }
    }

private:
    // You don't need to ** the vector<>,
    // because it's inside the class and 
    // will survive for as long as the class does
    // This vector will also be copied to copies of Foo,
    // but the pointers will remain the same at the time
    // of copying.
    // Keep in mind, if you want to share the vector, than
    // making it a std::shared_ptr of a
    // vector might not be a bad idea.
    vector<Bar*> bars;
};

If you pass the class by reference into functions, than the vector<Bar*> inside the class won't copy itself or delete itself, making it persist past a single stack frame.

In your main, this should clean up properly and is a lot easier to keep track of than vector** . However, if for some reason vector** is required, than home_monkey's answer should help you more.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. However, sorry I should have said in my original post, I'm looking for a 2d structure not 1d. I have elaborated in an update to my original post and in post comments. – junkie Sep 28 '12 at 14:54
    
You did, in the update. This guy needs to read. – CrazyCasta Sep 28 '12 at 14:57
    
I've edited the answer to include a clear example of what I think the OP wants. Let me know if it's not correct. – user1357649 Sep 28 '12 at 15:29
    
Thanks again. I know the size of my outer dimension but not the inner. – junkie Sep 28 '12 at 15:31
    
@junkie Then it would probably be best for you to have it in the configuration of std::array<vector<Bar>, OUTERDIMENSIONSIZE> bars . The std::array class represents a fixed-array, which means you won't be wasting space with it. The internal vector<Bar> should provide you with the dynamic inner size you need. It should be accessible like bars[0][1], and you can add as many Bar as you need by doing bars[targetrow].push_back( mybarelement ) – user1357649 Sep 28 '12 at 15:40

I think there is an issue with allocation. The line

new vector <Bar*> * [10] 

will give you an array of points to objects of type vector <Bar*> * and you will need to allocate some additional memory for your vector <Bar*> type.

I've had a go,

Foo() 
{
    bars = new vector<Bar*>*[10]; // A.

    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) 
    {
        bars[i] = new vector<Bar*>;  //  B. Extra memory assigned here.
        bars[i]->push_back(new Bar); //  C.
    }
}

To free resources, you'll have to reverse the above

~Foo () 
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) 
    {
        //  I'm assuming that each vector has one element
        delete bars[i][0]; //  Free C 
        delete bars[i];    //  Free B    
    }

    delete [] bars; // Free A
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice work, you've given a less general explanation then my answer. – CrazyCasta Sep 28 '12 at 14:46

I don't believe you're even allocating it properly. To undo what you've done so far, all you'd have to do is:

for(int i=0; i < 10; ++i)
    while(bars[i]->size > 0)
    {
        delete *bars[i]->front();
        pop_front();
    }
delete[] bars;

But, you need to allocate each of the vectors themselves, for instance in the constructor:

for(int i=0; i<10; ++i)
    bars[i] = new vector<Bar*>();

Which would require you change the destructor to:

for(int i=0; i < 10; ++i)
{
    while(bars[i]->size > 0)
    {
        delete *bars[i]->front();
        pop_front();
    }
    delete bars[i];
}
delete[] bars;

With regard to your update, I would then suggest changing the type of bars to:

vector<Bar*>* bars;

and the allocation to (without the need to do the for loop allocation suggested above):

bars = new vector<Bar*>[10];
share|improve this answer
1  
So far, each element has been individually newed. – chris Sep 28 '12 at 14:24
    
This would only get rid of the array of vectors, not the things they point at. – Benj Sep 28 '12 at 14:27
    
@chris Yeah, I didn't catch that he was allocating bars. – CrazyCasta Sep 28 '12 at 14:30
    
newing up vectors sounds very silly. – R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 28 '12 at 14:47
    
Yes, well, his original post was unclear why he wanted vector pointers, so I just played along. As you can see, I suggest later that he just change the type. – CrazyCasta Sep 28 '12 at 14:52

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