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i am trying to make a program that will compute for the root of a cubic function using cardano's method

here's my code:

#include<iostream>
#include<cmath>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    double a, b, c, d, value;
    double f, g, h;
    double i, j, k, l, m, n, p, po;
    double r, s, t, u;
    double x1, x2, x2re, x2im, x3re, x3im, x3;

    cin >> value;
    for(int w=1; w <= value; w++){
       cin >> a >> b >> c >> d;
       cout << "CUBIC EQUATION : " << a << " x^3 + " << b << " x^2 + " << c <<" x + " << d << " = 0" << endl;

       f = ((3*c/a)-((b*b)/(a*a)))/3;
       g = ((2*(b*b*b)/(a*a*a))-(9*b*c/(a*a))+(27*d/a))/27;   
       h = ((g*g)/4)+((f*f*f)/27);


    if(f==0 && g==0 && h==0){     // all roots are real and equal
       x1 = pow((d/a),0.33333333333333333333333333333333);
       x2 = pow((d/a),0.33333333333333333333333333333333);
       x3 = pow((d/a),0.33333333333333333333333333333333);
       cout << "x = " << x1 << endl;
       cout << "x = " << x2 << endl;
       cout << "x = " << x3 << endl;
       }
    else if(h<=0){         // all 3 roots are real
       i = pow((((g*g)/4)-h),0.5);
       j = pow(i,0.33333333333333333333333333333333);
       k = acos((g/(2*i))*-1);
       l = j * -1;
       m = cos(k/3);
       n = sqrt(3) * sin(k/3);
       p = (b/(3*a))*-1;
       x1 = (2*j)*m-(b/(3*a));
       cout << "x = " << x1 << endl;
       x2 = l * (m+n) + p;
       cout << "x = " << x2 << endl;
       x3 = l * (m-n) + p;
       cout << "x = " << x3 << endl;
       }
    else if(h>0){
       r = ((g/2)*-1)+pow(h,0.5);
       s = pow(r,0.33333333333333333333333333333333);
       t = ((g/2)*-1)-pow(h,0.5);
       u = pow((t),0.33333333333333333333333333333333);
       x1 = (s+u) - (b/(3*a));
       cout << "x = " << x1 << endl;
       x2re = (((s+u)*-1)/2) - (b/(3*a));
       x2im = -(s-u)*pow(3,0.5)/2;
       cout << "x = (" << x2re << "," << x2im << ")" << endl;
       x3re = (((s+u)*-1)/2) - (b/(3*a));
       x3im = (s-u)*pow(3,0.5)/2;
       cout << "x = (" << x3re << "," << x3im << ")" << endl;
       }
       }

    return 0;
}

can anyone help implement a user-defined ComplexNumber in this code? I want to use this link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cubic_function but i cant understand this.

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closed as not a real question by Mat, Jav_Rock, tereško, Eitan T, owlstead Sep 28 '12 at 23:41

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Complex number? Like the one that already exist in the standard library? Or some other kind of "complex number"? –  Joachim Pileborg Sep 28 '12 at 14:36
    
i need to define a user-defined Complex Number –  user1706468 Sep 28 '12 at 14:41
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1 Answer

can anyone help implement a user-defined ComplexNumber in this code?

Don't implement a user-defined ComplexNumber type. Use the one provided by the language. Just #include <complex>. With that you can have a complex variable simply by complex<double> variable_name.

Code comments:

  1. It's better to use std::sqrt(x) rather than std::pow(x, 0.5).
  2. If you are on a POSIX-compliant machine, your math library has a cube root function, cbrt(double) in the header . (It may not be exported to the C++ header .) This too is preferable over std::pow(x,0.33333333333333333333333333333333).
share|improve this answer
    
i am not allowed to use that and i also want to learn how to make a user-defined functions. I am just a newbie in this programming language –  user1706468 Sep 28 '12 at 14:49
1  
If that's the case, you've violated two of the rules of this site. (1) don't ask us to write a book, and (2) don't ask us to do your homework for you. –  David Hammen Sep 28 '12 at 14:56
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