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My constructor code in "FileData.cs" file:

public FileData(BatchData batch)
{
    this._batch = batch;
}

I want to access the properties from the "FileData.cs" file. So, I used the following code:

FileData fd = new FileData();

It shows the error message as "Constructor does not take 0 arguments". I don't know how to access the properties from the class. Provide me a solution. Thanks.

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4  
you need to pass the parameter to the FileData Constructor –  Runner Sep 28 '12 at 14:48
4  
new FileData(new BatchData()); –  L.B Sep 28 '12 at 14:49
    
I mean you no disrespect, but for your own good, you should read a c# book. –  Alex Mendez Sep 28 '12 at 14:54
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5 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You don't have a default constructor. You must include one as the compiler doesn't generate one by default.

Basically since you defined an explicit constructor with an argument, the compiler doesn't generate a default one, hence your error.

Or:

FileData fd = new FileData(new BatchData());
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1  
Or he needs to pass the required parameter for the existing constructor. The class may not be able to function without it... –  Servy Sep 28 '12 at 14:49
    
@Servy Yeah, that's right. –  Lews Therin Sep 28 '12 at 14:51
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1)You should pass the parameter BatchData to your class.

BatchData bd = new BatchData();
FileData fd = new FileData(bd);

2) To access property you can ...

a)...just make it public:

class FileData
{
public BatchData _batch;

public FileData(BatchData batch)
{
    this._batch = batch;
}
}

and access your property like

fd._batch;

b) or you can write getter and setter

class FileData
{
private BatchData _batch {get; set;}

public FileData(BatchData batch)
{
    this._batch = batch;
}
}

and access like

BatchData bd = fd.getbd();
fd.setbd(bd);
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1  
Fields very rearely be publicly exposed. In C# you can use properties to more conveniently implement getters/setters than using methods. –  Servy Sep 28 '12 at 14:57
    
After your edit the code is just a mess. If you have a property (in this case) it should be public, not private, and you no longer have get/set calls, you need to update that example now that you are using properties. Additionally, your code in 2-a still has a public field, which you shouldn't have. Finally, you should really properly indent your code; it will make it much easier to read. –  Servy Sep 28 '12 at 15:19
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You'll need to add a parameterless constructor explicity

public FileData()
{
}

public FileData(BatchData batch)
{
    this._batch = batch;
}

Take into accoun that if _batch field is necessary for the class instance to be able to perform necessary operations, you'll need to initialize it on the parameterless constructor

public FileData()
{
    this._batch = new BatchType;
}

or expose it using a public property.

public BatchType Batch 
{
     get { return _batch; }
     set {_batch = value }
}

you could use automatic properties to simplify your code

public BatchType Batch { get; set }

public FileData(BatchData batch)
{
   this.Batch = batch;
}
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1  
If the BatchData is necessary then it would be a bad idea to create a parameterless constructor in the first place (even with a public property). The problem wouldn't be in the FileData definition but in the code that creates the instance. –  Servy Sep 28 '12 at 14:56
    
@Servy: I'll do that all the time for passing mocked objects, I don't see that it's wrong by default. It depends on the case. –  Claudio Redi Sep 28 '12 at 14:58
    
It's acceptable if the class can function without the object, or has some valid default behavior. If not then there is the period of time after the object is created and before the properties are populated in which it is in an invalid state. That has the potential to cause problems. To prevent the object from ever being accessible in that invalid state you use constructors; it's why they exist in the fist place. –  Servy Sep 28 '12 at 15:00
    
@Servy: ok, then we agree that your statement was too drastic. It depends on the case. As I said, we do that for passing mocked objects all the time (parameter on unit test vs parameterless on real code) –  Claudio Redi Sep 28 '12 at 15:08
    
We do not agree that my first statement was too drastic. If the object can function properly without the parameter then that parameter wouldn't be "necessary" now would it? –  Servy Sep 28 '12 at 15:16
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you should define Defualt Constructor for FileData Class :

public FileData()
    {

    }

and for access property : when you define a public property you can access this property from anthor class.

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The error message is rather explicit. You cannot construct a FileData object without passing in any data. You need to provide it with a BatchData instance, in it's constructor, in order to create a new FileData. Assuming this behavior is intended, then you'll need to create a new instance of BatchData, or access an existing one, and use that to construct the object.

If the problem is that you ought to be able to construct an instance of FileData without needing a BatchData instance then you need to add a new constructor to FileData that takes no parameters. If you do that, the code you have in your post will work again.

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