Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to reduce the consecutive NA's in a vector to a single NA, without touching the other values.
So, for example, given a vector like this:

NA NA  8  7 NA NA NA NA NA  3  3 NA -1  4

what I need to get, is the following result:

NA  8  7 NA  3  3 NA -1  4

Currently, I'm using the following function:

reduceConsecutiveNA2One <- function(vect){
  enc <- rle(is.na(vect))

  # helper func
  tmpFun <- function(i){
    if(enc$values[i]){
      data.frame(L=c(enc$lengths[i]-1, 1), V=c(TRUE,FALSE))
    }else{
      data.frame(L=enc$lengths[i], V=enc$values[i])
    }
  }

  Df <- do.call(rbind.data.frame,lapply(1:length(enc$lengths),FUN=tmpFun))

  return(vect[rep.int(!Df$V,Df$L)])
}

and it seems to work fine, but probably there's a simpler/faster way to accomplish this task.

Any suggestions ?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
1  
NA NA NA NA...NA NA NA NA...hey hey hey..nevermind –  Phillip Schmidt Sep 28 '12 at 15:23
    
I think the Wilson Pickett song goes: Nah ... na na na na ... nanananah ... nanana .. nananahna. And I do want to say... awesome accept rate. –  BondedDust Sep 28 '12 at 17:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Here's one idea:

x <- c(NA, NA,8,7,NA, NA, NA, NA, NA, 3, 3, NA, -1,  4)

x[!(is.na(x) & diff(c(FALSE, is.na(x)))==0)]
# [1] NA  8  7 NA  3  3 NA -1  4

## It also works for length-one vectors
x <- NA
x[!(is.na(x) & diff(c(FALSE, is.na(x)))==0)]
# [1] NA
share|improve this answer
    
Great! One-liner and pretty clear, thanks ! –  digEmAll Sep 28 '12 at 15:52
    
It could even be a bit shorter: x[!is.na(x) | diff(c(FALSE, is.na(x)))] –  Gabor Csardi Sep 29 '12 at 2:14

Maybe this could be useful

x <- c(NA, NA,8,7,NA, NA, NA, NA, NA, 3, 3, NA, -1,  4)
c(x[rowSums(is.na(embed(x,2)))!=2], x[length(x)])
[1] NA  8  7 NA  3  3 NA -1  4

If you want a function try:

myfun <- function(x){
  if(length(x)==1) {
    return(x)
  }
  else{
    return(c(x[rowSums(is.na(embed(x,2)))!=2], x[length(x)]))
  }
}

> myfun(x)
[1] NA  8  7 NA  3  3 NA -1  4
> y <- c(x, NA, NA, NA, 3)
> y
 [1] NA NA  8  7 NA NA NA NA NA  3  3 NA -1  4 NA NA NA  3
> myfun(y)
 [1] NA  8  7 NA  3  3 NA -1  4 NA  3
> myfun(NA)
[1] NA
> myfun(1)
[1] 1
share|improve this answer
    
Really smart. It just needs to check if the vector has one element only (because it crashes). –  digEmAll Sep 28 '12 at 15:38
1  
@digEmAll myfun now check for length and it now can handle vectors with length 1. –  Jilber Sep 28 '12 at 15:55

A fun little exercise using head and tail:

merge.na <- function(x) c(head(x, 1), tail(x, -1)[!(is.na(tail(x, -1)) &
                                                    is.na(head(x, -1)))])
share|improve this answer
    
This is also very elegant and clever ! Thank you :) –  digEmAll Sep 29 '12 at 9:10

Not as cool as the other responses but a different approach using rle:

x <- c(NA, NA,  8,  7, NA, NA, NA, NA, NA,  3,  3, NA, -1,  4)
x[is.na(x)] <- 999
y <- rle(x)
y[[1]][y[[2]]==999] <- 1
y[[2]][y[[2]]==999] <- NA
rep(y[[2]], y[[1]])

#per Dason's Suggestion:
inverse.rle(y)

It is actually surprising to me the rle doesn't group NAs together. It does this:

> rle(x)
Run Length Encoding
  lengths: int [1:13] 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 ...
  values : num [1:13] NA NA 8 7 NA NA NA NA NA 3 ...

Hence the need to recode to 999

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, unfortunately rle doesn't recode NAs (it would be easier if it does). The problem is that I can't consider any value as out of range (not 999, not 99999 and so on...) and use it in place of NAs. –  digEmAll Sep 28 '12 at 16:02
    
@Sven not sure if your comment is for my solution or the rle and NA thing. My solution works with consecutive integers as the example I provide shows. But alas it won't work for didEmAll's needs. I mean you could convert this to character by adding a character value and then replace and convert back but it was already a less cool solution to begin with :) –  Tyler Rinker Sep 28 '12 at 16:54
2  
Don't forget about inverse.rle. It essentially just does what you have in the last line of code but is a little bit safer. –  Dason Sep 28 '12 at 19:16
    
@Dason Forget? I never knew about it. I added it to show its use. –  Tyler Rinker Sep 28 '12 at 19:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.