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I seem to be having a hard time getting my here-document to work properly. I have a chunk of text that I need stuffed into a variable and remain un-interpolated.

Here's what I have:

my $move_func <<'FUNC';
function safemove
{
    if [[ ! -f $1 ]] ; then echo "Source File Not Found: $1"; return 1; fi
    if [[ ! -r $1 ]] ; then echo "Cannot Read Source File: $1"; return 2; fi
    if [[ -f $2 ]]   ; then echo "Destination File Already Exists: $1 -> $2"; return 3; fi
    mv $1 $2
}
FUNC

# Do stuff with $move_func

Which gives me

Scalar found where operator expected at ./heredoc.pl line 9, near "$1 $2"
        (Missing operator before $2?)
Semicolon seems to be missing at ./heredoc.pl line 10.
syntax error at ./heredoc.pl line 6, near "if"
syntax error at ./heredoc.pl line 10, near "$1 $2
"
Execution of ./heredoc.pl aborted due to compilation errors.

However, the following works as expected:

print <<'FUNC';
function safemove
{
    if [[ ! -f $1 ]] ; then echo "Source File Not Found: $1"; return 1; fi
    if [[ ! -r $1 ]] ; then echo "Cannot Read Source File: $1"; return 2; fi
    if [[ -f $2 ]]   ; then echo "Destination File Already Exists: $1 -> $2"; return 3; fi
    mv $1 $2
}
FUNC

What am I doing wrong?

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2  
(Without the assignment, << was interpreted as a left-shift operator.) –  ikegami Sep 28 '12 at 15:50
    
Ahh!! Same problem here - just dumping my sort of errors, to improve searching: "Useless use of left bitshift (<<) in void context", "Argument "EOF" isn't numeric in left bitshift", "Use of uninitialized value $TESTVAR in left bitshift", "Use of uninitialized value $TESTVAR in concatenation (.) or string". –  sdaau Aug 11 '13 at 12:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to assign the string using the assignment operator to form a complete statement:

my $move_func = <<'FUNC';
function safemove
{
    if [[ ! -f $1 ]] ; then echo "Source File Not Found: $1"; return 1; fi
    if [[ ! -r $1 ]] ; then echo "Cannot Read Source File: $1"; return 2; fi
    if [[ -f $2 ]]   ; then echo "Destination File Already Exists: $1 -> $2"; return 3; fi
    mv $1 $2
}
FUNC

# Do stuff with $move_func
share|improve this answer
3  
Sonofabitch, I can't believe I missed that. Thanks for the help! –  Mr. Llama Sep 28 '12 at 15:38
    
It's alright-- it's pretty subtle! :-) –  Platinum Azure Sep 28 '12 at 15:47

You missed out the = sign:

my $move_func = <<'FUNC';
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