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I am trying to communicate with an interactive process. I want my perl script to be a "moddle man" between the user and the process. The process puts text to stdout, prompts the user for a command, puts more text to stdout, prompts the user for a command, ....... A primitive graphic is provided:

 User <----STDOUT---- interface.pl <-----STDOUT--- Process
 User -----STDIN----> interface.pl ------STDIN---> Process
 User <----STDOUT---- interface.pl <-----STDOUT--- Process
 User -----STDIN----> interface.pl ------STDIN---> Process
 User <----STDOUT---- interface.pl <-----STDOUT--- Process
 User -----STDIN----> interface.pl ------STDIN---> Process

The following simulates what I'm trying to do:

    #!/usr/bin/perl

    use strict;
    use warnings;

    use FileHandle;
    use IPC::Open2;
    my  $pid = open2( \*READER, \*WRITER, "cat -n" );
    WRITER->autoflush(); # default here, actually
    my $got = "";
    my $input = " ";

    while ($input ne "") {
            chomp($input = <STDIN>);
            print WRITER "$input \n";
            $got = <READER>;
            print $got;
    }

DUe to output buffering the above example does not work. No matter what text is typed in, or how many enters are pressed the program just sits there. The way to fix it is to issue:

    my  $pid = open2( \*READER, \*WRITER, "cat -un" );

Notice "cat -un" as opposed to just "cat -n". -u turns off output buffering on cat. When output buffering is turned off this works. The process I am trying to interact with most likely buffers output as I am facing the same issues with "cat -n". Unfortunately I can not turn off output buffering on the process I am communicating with, so how do I handle this issue?

UPDATE1 (using ptty):

    #!/usr/bin/perl

    use strict;
    use warnings;

    use IO::Pty;
    use IPC::Open2;

    my $reader = new IO::Pty;
    my $writer = new IO::Pty;

    my  $pid = open2( $reader, $writer, "cat -n" );
    my $got = "";
    my $input = " ";

    $writer->autoflush(1);

    while ($input ne "") {
            chomp($input = <STDIN>);
            $writer->print("$input \n");
            $got = $reader->getline;
            print $got;
    }

~

share|improve this question
    
open2 always opens its own pipes, you can't give it ptys. See perlmonks.org/?node_id=835953 for a simple example that uses IO::Pty::Easy. –  Barmar Sep 28 '12 at 17:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

There are three kinds of buffering:

  1. Block buffering: Output is placed into a fixed-sized buffer. The buffer is flushed when it becomes full. You'll see the output come out in chunks.
  2. Line buffering: Output is placed into a fixed-sized buffer. The buffer is flushed when a newline is added to the buffer and when it becomes full.
  3. No buffering: Output is passed directly to the OS.

In Perl, buffering works as follows:

  • File handles are buffered by default. One exception: STDERR is not buffered by default.
  • Block buffering is used. One exception: STDOUT is line buffered if and only if it's connected to a terminal.
  • Reading from STDIN flushes the buffer for STDOUT.
  • Until recently, Perl used 4KB buffers. Now, the default is 8KB, but that can be changed when Perl is built.

This first two are surprisingly standard across all applications. That means:

  • User -------> interface.pl

    User is a person. He doesn't buffer per say, though it's a very slow source of data. OK

  • interface.pl ----> Process

    interface.pl's output is block buffered. BAD

    Fixed by adding the following to interface.pl:

    use IO::Handle qw( );
    WRITER->autoflush(1);
    
  • Process ----> interface.pl

    Process's output is block buffered. BAD

    Fixed by adding the following to Process:

    use IO::Handle qw( );
    STDOUT->autoflush(1);
    

    Now, you're probably going to tell me you can't change Process. If so, that leaves you three options:

    • Use a command line or configuration option provided by tool to change its buffering behaviour. I don't know of any tools that provide such an option.
    • Fool the child to use line buffering instead of block buffering by using a pseudo tty instead of a pipe.
    • Quitting.

  • interface.pl -------> User

    interface.pl's output is line buffered. OK (right?)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the very detailed explanation. I've been googling and saw a lot of explanations discussing using a ptty. The examples and even the cPan doc on ptty is very ambiguous. I have not incorporated your suggestions (yet) but prior to reading this I "converted" my code to use ptty but it is still not working. Could you tell me if I'm "doing it right" or provide me with an example using my code above. –  user974896 Sep 28 '12 at 16:54
    
I will look into IO::Pty::Easy. Just wondering what is the issue with block buffering? Why does the process just sit there as opposed to send the block? I don't care if it comes back line by line or as a block. Are you implying that pipes are inherently block buffered? If so why does "awk '{print $2}' | df -h | grep "SOMETHING" work? Why don't these hang due to buffering? –  user974896 Sep 28 '12 at 19:03
    
The only issue is that you said you didn't want it. // They don't sit there not sending, they sit there waiting for input. // No, it's programs that buffer. // df doesn't hang waiting for input because df does not take any input. Contrary to what you said, grep DOES hang waiting for input (since df's output is surely block buffered, but df finishes very fast, so grep only hangs for a blink of an eye. –  ikegami Sep 28 '12 at 19:16
    
Then why is the original program not working? If Process sits there waiting for input and interface.pl sends it via stdout, shouldn't process take that as STDIN, do it's thing, and spit the output (as a block, line, or otherwise) back out STDOUT for interface.pl to receive on it's stdin? –  user974896 Sep 28 '12 at 19:26
    
Process sits there waiting for input because interface.pl it not sending any out at the moment. There's nothing to take from STDIN. If there was, it would take it. interface.pl will eventually place 4K or 8K into the pipe, and Process will start reading from that as soon as it happens. –  ikegami Sep 28 '12 at 19:28

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