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int main() {

 class A {
    public:
    static double test_code(const A& a);
  };

   class B : public A {
   public:
   B(int i) { };
   static double test_code2(const B& b);
   };

A::test_code(2);
B::test_code2(2);

return 0;

}

cf : http://ideone.com/ilfE8

The first method call will not compile, while the second will. Is there any way to make this conversion work? thanks

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6  
Can you declare a class inside the main? –  Coding Mash Sep 28 '12 at 16:01
1  
What are you expecting to convert to what? –  Realz Slaw Sep 28 '12 at 16:02
1  
"Is there any way to make this conversion work?" Conversion from 2 to A? Not without specifying a derived type with a relevant constructor as a parameter (e.g., B(2)) or a relevant constructor in A. –  user1201210 Sep 28 '12 at 16:02
    
@CodingMash MSVC 2012 does not complain about the class being inside main(). It says local class but no errors. –  Hindol Sep 28 '12 at 16:06
4  
@CodingMash: You can declare types inside functions, yes. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 28 '12 at 16:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No, that cannot be done for an implicit type conversion. There are multiple reasons for that, the simpler is that for that to be an option the compiler would have to know at the place of call about all possible types that extend A and then check whether any/all of them can be implicitly converted from an int, resolve potential ambiguities... note that all types extending from a given type is an open set that can be extended after the current translation unit has been built!

You can achieve something alike that in different ways, like for example creating a function that takes the int and returns an A object, or explicitly creating the B. But none of them allow for an implicit conversion (i.e. without modifying the code to explicitly request the path for the conversion).

share|improve this answer

This compiles fine,

int main()
{
    class A {
    public:
        A(int i)
        {}
        static double test_code(const A& a) { return 0.0; }
    };

    class B : public A {
    public:
        B(int i)
            : A(i) {}
        static double test_code2(const B& b) { return 0.0; }
    };

    A::test_code(2);
    B::test_code2(2);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
yeah but the whole point is that I don't want A to have the constructor you added –  lezebulon Sep 28 '12 at 16:16
    
Well, then it is not possible. C++ is a language with its pre-defined rules. It cannot just read your mind. –  Hindol Sep 28 '12 at 16:18
1  
@lezebulon - if that is the "whole point", it should be mentioned in the question. –  Robᵩ Sep 28 '12 at 16:24
    
@lezebulon And I got a downvote trying to help you. –  Hindol Sep 28 '12 at 16:26
    
@Hindol that's not really my fault though... –  lezebulon Sep 28 '12 at 16:30

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