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I'm working on a blog that implements Disqus comments and I'm making an effort to make as much use of HTML5 semantic markups as possible.

Here's an example <article /> (itself within a <section />), fairly simple:

  <article class="post">
    <header>
      <h2>Title</h2>
      <p class="posted-on">Posted on <time datetime="2012-07-28T13:00:24+01:00">July 28th 2012</time>.</p>
    </header>
    <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet...</p>
    <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet...</p>
    <!-- blog comments -->
  </article>

With the above structure, I'm unsure semantically where to integrate the article's comments.

  • A <footer /> is clearly not appropriate ("The footer element is not sectioning content; it doesn't introduce a new section.")
  • Disqus uses async JavaScript to create an <iframe /> to contain the comment widget, so a <p /> doesn't seem appropriate, either.

Am I over-thinking the semantic markup thing: is it best to just stick it into a <div /> and not worry about it?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could stick it in its own <section> (rather than a <div>) within your containing <section>, as a sibling of your <article>. But if you're using Disqus, I guess whichever element you use doesn't matter. I don't think it belongs within the article content though. Maybe an <aside> instead?

Just keep in mind that when it comes to semantics, there aren't any hard and fast rules. As long as your document is structured and outlined in a meaningful way, that's what matters.

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Thanks BoltClock. I had considered putting it in its own <section />, but I hadn't considered putting it outside the <article /> as its sibling. That might be a perfect solution! I don't however think that <aside /> would be appropriate, because ("The aside element represents a section of a page that consists of content that is tangentially related to the content around the aside element, and which could be considered separate from that content." (dev.w3.org/html5/spec/the-aside-element.html#the-aside-element). –  msanford Sep 28 '12 at 16:25

There is an example in the HTML5 spec for a blog post with comments. Which makes sense, in my opinion.

Your example could look like:

  <article class="post">
    <header>
      <h1>Title</h1>
      <p class="posted-on">Posted on <time datetime="2012-07-28T13:00:24+01:00">July 28th 2012</time>.</p>
    </header>
    <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet...</p>
    <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet...</p>

    <section>
      <h1>Comments</h1>

      <article><!-- comment 1--></article>
      <article><!-- comment 2--></article>
      <article><!-- comment 3--></article>

    <section>

  </article>

Side note: I think your "posted-on" would better fit into a footer instead of a header. So your header could be omitted because it would only contain the heading. So your example could look like:

  <article class="post">

    <h1>Title</h1>

    <footer class="posted-on">Posted on <time datetime="2012-07-28T13:00:24+01:00">July 28th 2012</time>.</footer>

    <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet...</p>
    <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet...</p>

    <section>
      <h1>Comments</h1>

      <article><!-- comment 1--></article>
      <article><!-- comment 2--></article>
      <article><!-- comment 3--></article>

    <section>

  </article>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks unor. I wonder why the comments title is enclosed with an <h1 /> while the article's title is enclosed within an <h2 />; that seems wrong to me (they could very well both be <h1 />s though). Also, I had considered putting the "posted on" data within a <footer /> (but at the top of the article, as you suggest) but even the spec on <article /> you link puts it in the <header />, while the specs suggest that footer might well be more appropriate. Is there a semantic advantage to putting it in a <footer />? –  msanford Oct 1 '12 at 16:02
    
@msanford: Regarding the headings: it doesn't matter which level you choose, the first heading (no matter the level) will be the heading of the section. Typically, you'd always use h1, or you'd use the level corresponding to the overall outline. So yes, it's not very good style to mix this; I updated the code in my answer. –  unor Oct 1 '12 at 20:41
    
@msanford: Regarding footer vs header: I think we should use the elements according to the normative definition in the specification, not the informative examples. Because the normative information is what all the other entities (screenreaders, search engines, …) will (or better: should) use to program their software. However, this very case (the difference between footer and header) is not perfectly clear. So I wouldn't say it's an error to use header for publication date. –  unor Oct 1 '12 at 20:46

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