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Does anybody knows how to generate a .Net DateTime.Ticks in a PL/SQL stored procedure, without having a .Net assembly in the Oracle database?

I have a service in .Net storing the DateTime.Ticks value in a column [Oracle database]. Now I have to create a stored procedure to create similar information, but I have to match .Net ticks in that particular column.

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4 Answers

Use Oracle functions to calculate the number of seconds since the epoch (12:00:00 midnight, January 1, 0001), ignoring leap seconds, and multiply by 10e6 (ten million) to get ticks.

The definition of .NET time ticks is found here.

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The epoch is 1970 –  Cole Johnson Sep 28 '12 at 17:45
    
@ColeJohnson: That's the epoch for a Unix timestamp. But this question isn't about generating Unix timestamps. –  Ben Voigt Sep 28 '12 at 18:37
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I'm not familiar with Oracle PL/SQL, but the following DateToTicks() C# function (taken directly from Mono's open source DateTime implementation) reveals the details of how ticks are computed given the individual components of a DateTime value. Perhaps it is of help.

Good Luck!

      public const long TicksPerDay = 864000000000L;
      private static readonly int[] daysmonth = { 0, 31, 28, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31 };
      private static readonly int[] daysmonthleap = { 0, 31, 29, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31 };

      private static int AbsoluteDays(int year, int month, int day) {
         int[] days;
         int temp = 0, m = 1;

         days = (IsLeapYear(year) ? daysmonthleap : daysmonth);

         while( m < month )
            temp += days[m++];
         return ((day - 1) + temp + (365 * (year - 1)) + ((year - 1) / 4) - ((year - 1) / 100) + ((year - 1) / 400));
      }

      public static bool IsLeapYear(int year) {
         if( year < 1 || year > 9999 )
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
         return ((year % 4 == 0 && year % 100 != 0) || year % 400 == 0);
      }


      internal static bool CalculateTicks(int days, int hours, int minutes, int seconds, int milliseconds, out long result) {
         // there's no overflow checks for hours, minutes, ...
         // so big hours/minutes values can overflow at some point and change expected values
         int hrssec = (hours * 3600); // break point at (Int32.MaxValue - 596523)
         int minsec = (minutes * 60);
         long t = ((long)(hrssec + minsec + seconds) * 1000L + (long)milliseconds);
         t *= 10000;

         result = 0;

         bool overflow = false;
         // days is problematic because it can overflow but that overflow can be 
         // "legal" (i.e. temporary) (e.g. if other parameters are negative) or 
         // illegal (e.g. sign change).
         if( days > 0 ) {
            long td = TicksPerDay * days;
            if( t < 0 ) {
               long ticks = t;
               t += td;
               // positive days -> total ticks should be lower
               overflow = (ticks > t);
            } else {
               t += td;
               // positive + positive != negative result
               overflow = (t < 0);
            }
         } else if( days < 0 ) {
            long td = TicksPerDay * days;
            if( t <= 0 ) {
               t += td;
               // negative + negative != positive result
               overflow = (t > 0);
            } else {
               long ticks = t;
               t += td;
               // negative days -> total ticks should be lower
               overflow = (t > ticks);
            }
         }

         if( overflow ) {
            return false;
         }

         result = t;
         return true;
      }

      public static bool  DateToTicks (int year, int month, int day, int hour, int minute, int second, int millisecond, out long result) {
         return CalculateTicks(AbsoluteDays(year, month, day), hour, minute, second, millisecond, out result);
      }
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The Ticks property is a long so you need to use a fitting Oracle type: 'Number'

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The idea is to generate the ticks in oracle. It doesn't come from any .Net application (this I already have). –  Roberto Sep 28 '12 at 16:43
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I figured out the whole algorithm and built a function. It works like a charm...

Here it goes:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION GLOBAL.Get_DotNet_Ticks
(
       inTimestamp IN TIMESTAMP
) RETURN NUMBER AS
-- **********************************************************************************
-- File name:         Get_DotNet_Ticks
-- Original Author:   Roberto Lopes
-- Creation Date:     October 2012
-- Description:       Returns the number of ticks for the provided timestamp, based
--                    on the Microsoft .Net algorithm
-- **********************************************************************************
BeginDate TIMESTAMP := TO_TIMESTAMP('0001-01-03', 'YYYY-MM-DD'); --.Net Ticks are counted starting from this date
BEGIN
    RETURN (EXTRACT(DAY FROM(inTimestamp - BeginDate)) * 86400000 + (TO_NUMBER(TO_CHAR(inTimestamp, 'SSSSSFF3'))))*10000;
END Get_DotNet_Ticks;
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