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I am making image array in javascript to preload the images. The code for this look like as follows.

imageArr[0]=new Image();        
imageArr[0].src='mypath/myimgname.jpg'; 
imageArr[1]=new Image();        
imageArr[1].src='mypath/myimgname.jpg'; 
imageArr[2]=new Image();        
imageArr[2].src='mypath/myimgname.jpg'; 

Then I am using this element in may code when ever required. I declare this array in starting of my each page. We are having this kind of 150 big size images required on each page.

So my question is, As I am writing this code on each page. Will it be loading images again and again on each page. Or it will load image in browser just once. and after that when I am writing this array again on second page. then it is just using which it has in browser. Or It is getting the images from server again and again?

If this approach is wrong what should be the right approach for this?

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4 Answers 4

if you are using jquery then i suggest you to do it with waitforimages plugin.

However, your approach is not wrong, it's a more simple and the pictures are still taken from the cache

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The images (jpg) remain in the cache of browser, but imageArr is not more in the Javascript scope when you change page (if, as i imagine, you defined that array in the global context) So you need to reinitialize it everytime. I see nothing wrong in your approach, but i don't know exactly what you want to obtain.

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PHP can send headers to the browser to tell it to cache content. See here:

If you don't send the headers, the browser may or may not cache the images and all browsers won't work exactly the same. If you do send the headers, there's no guarantee that the browser will cache anyway. The browser could ignore the cache request for various reasons, such as the user is in private browsing mode.

Lets assume you do get the caching working, across all browsers. Well, a page with 150 large images is going to look and perform poorly, no amount of caching will prevent the first load from being slow.

Have you considered a different approach? Such as showing a single large image and a set of thumbnails and swapping out the large image if a thumbnail is chosen. This would mean no huge load on the first page view, and no need for any special fixes like lengthy caching.

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Dena... I use this method to pre-cache my images all the time and I have always found it to be rather efficient. Once the Image Obj is created and you assign the Image its src the image will be in your cache for good or until you decide to clear it out. The Array acts as a container for all the images and allows you to assign the image to an element if need be.

One option is that you could create a single Array in the 'index/default' script and create all the images you need but this would lead to the issue obe6 mentioned. The Array would not exist anymore when you navigate away from the page (The images will still be cached though). If you want to have an Array available to you on every page then you could just create a new Array for each page and load in the images that are specific to that page. This is the approach that I take and it seems more organized and it can also increase loading times.

As I mentioned above, having a separate Array for each page allows you to assign the image to an element from the Array. Ill use your code for example:

javaScript:

var imageArr = new Array();

imageArr[0]=new Image();        
imageArr[0].src='mypath/myimgname.jpg'; 
imageArr[1]=new Image();        
imageArr[1].src='mypath/myimgname.jpg'; 
imageArr[2]=new Image();        
imageArr[2].src='mypath/myimgname.jpg';

var testImage01 = document.getElementById("testImage01");
testImage01.src = imageArr[0].src;

HTML:

<table>
    <tr>
        <td>
            <img id="testImage01" src="" alt="Test Image" />
        </td>
    </tr>
</table>

Remember to run the JS onload or the img element will not be available yet. You didnt have any jQuery in your example code but you could use $(document).ready() if you are.

Hope this help and gives you some better insight on using this method.

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