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I'm looking to fill an object model with the count of a linq-to-sql query that groups by its key.

The object model looks somewhat like this:

public class MyCountModel()
{
  int CountSomeByte1 { get; set; }
  int CountSomeByte2 { get; set; }
  int CountSomeByte3 { get; set; }
  int CountSomeByte4 { get; set; }
  int CountSomeByte5 { get; set; }
  int CountSomeByte6 { get; set; }
}

This is what I have for the query:

var TheQuery = from x in MyDC.TheTable
               where ListOfRecordIDs.Contains(x.RecordID) && x.SomeByte < 7
               group x by x.SomeByte into TheCount
               select new MyCountModel()
               {
                   CountSomeByte1 = TheCount.Where(TheCount => TheCount.Key == 1)
                                            .Select(TheCount).Count(),

                   CountSomeByte2 = TheCount.Where(TheCount => TheCount.Key == 2)
                                            .Select(TheCount).Count(),     
                   .....

                   CountSomeByte6 = TheCount.Where(TheCount => TheCount.Key == 6)
                                            .Select(TheCount).Count(), 

               }.Single();

ListOfRecordIDs is list of longs that's passed in as a parameter. All the CountSomeByteN are underlined red. How do you do a count of grouped elements with the group's key mapped to an object model?

Thanks for your suggestions.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The select is taking each element of your group and projecting them to identical newly created MyCountModels, and you're only using one of them. Here's how I'd do it:

var dict = MyDC.TheTable
    .Where(x => ListOfRecordIDs.Contains(x.RecordID) && x.SomeByte < 7)
    .GroupBy(x => x.SomeByte)
    .ToDictionary(grp => grp.Key, grp => grp.Count());

var result = new MyCountModel()
{
    CountSomeByte1 = dict[1];
    CountSomeByte2 = dict[2];
    CountSomeByte3 = dict[3];
    CountSomeByte4 = dict[4];
    CountSomeByte5 = dict[5];
    CountSomeByte6 = dict[6];
}

EDIT: Here's one way to do it in one statement. It uses an extension method called Into, which basically works as x.Into(f) == f(x). In this context, it can be viewed as like a Select that works on the whole enumerable rather than on its members. I find it handy for eliminating temporary variables in this sort of situation, and if I were to write this in one statement, it's probably how I'd do it:

public static U Into<T, U>(this T self, Func<T, U> func)
{
    return func(self);
}

var result = MyDC.TheTable
    .Where(x => ListOfRecordIDs.Contains(x.RecordID) && x.SomeByte < 7)
    .GroupBy(x => x.SomeByte)
    .ToDictionary(grp => grp.Key, grp => grp.Count())
    .Into(dict => new MyCountModel()
    {
        CountSomeByte1 = dict[1];
        CountSomeByte2 = dict[2];
        CountSomeByte3 = dict[3];
        CountSomeByte4 = dict[4];
        CountSomeByte5 = dict[5];
        CountSomeByte6 = dict[6];
    });
share|improve this answer
    
Do i also need an orderby to make sure that CountSomeByte1 = dict[1]; Also, is there a way to make it work in just one statement? – frenchie Sep 28 '12 at 19:50
    
1) No. dict is a Dictionary, and 1 is a dictionary key, not an array index. dict[1] will be the count of the records whose SomeByte is 1, because that's how the grouping was done. 2) I'm sure there's a way, but I doubt that it would be as straightforward. I'll play around with it. – Thom Smith Sep 28 '12 at 20:00
    
ok, thanks; I think it's fine as is. – frenchie Sep 28 '12 at 20:09
    
What if you use .Select and then project the dictionary onto the object model's properties? Would that work? .Select(x => new MyCountModel() { ... }); ? – frenchie Sep 28 '12 at 20:21
    
Select is for turning one sort of sequence into some other sort of sequence. In this case, the Dictionary is interpreted as an IEnumerable of KeyValuePairs, but you don't want to get a sequence out of it, but rather a single object. Thus, Select really isn't the right tool. Now, you might think of your MyCountModel as being kind of like a sequence, but the language doesn't let you treat it that way. – Thom Smith Sep 28 '12 at 20:28

Your range variable is not correct in the subqueries:

     CountSomeByte6 = TheCount.Where(TheCount => TheCount.Key == 6)
                                        .Select(TheCount).Count(), 

In method notation you don't need the extra select:

CountSomeByte6 = TheCount.Where(theCount => theCount.Key == 6).Count(), 

If you want to use it anyway:

CountSomeByte6 = TheCount.Where(theCount => theCount.Key == 6).Select(theCount => theCount).Count(), 
share|improve this answer
    
ok, the syntax errors do go away but now, at runtime, I get a "Sequence contains more than one element" error. – frenchie Sep 28 '12 at 17:01
    
You are calling Single, which means you expect exactly one element, but apparently the query returns more than one element, just as the message says. – jeroenh Sep 28 '12 at 17:02
    
Yes, I'm calling Single because I'm only looking for one MyCountModel() to be returned. Why is it returning more than 1?? – frenchie Sep 28 '12 at 17:03
    
read the documentation of Single. You need First or FirstOrDefault. – jeroenh Sep 28 '12 at 17:04
    
If I replace Single with First, it works. But why? – frenchie Sep 28 '12 at 17:05

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