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If I don't use strict; the following code works fine and prints out "alice":

assign_name();
print_name();

sub assign_name {
    $name = "alice";
}

sub print_name {
    print $name;
}

However when I do use strict; then I know I'll have to declare the variable before using it. I read somewhere I should use our instead of my to declare a global variable. So I had the following:

use strict;
use warnings;

assign_name();
print_name();

sub assign_name {
    our $name = "alice";
}

sub print_name {
    print $name;   # This is line 12.

}

And then I get the following error:

Variable "$name" is not imported at test.pl line 12.
Global symbol "$name" requires explicit package name at test.pl line 12.
Execution of test.pl aborted due to compilation errors.

Please help.

share|improve this question
1  
You should avoid using global variables. It will make your code easier to read, and avoid simple mistakes. –  TLP Sep 28 '12 at 17:54
3  
I also want to say, good for you user! Using strict is a good idea, and too often when new Perlers find that something doesn't work when using it, they are quick to abandon it. Good for you for asking why your code doesn't work and learning to do it correctly! :-) –  Joel Berger Sep 29 '12 at 1:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Just declare the variable where both subs can see it.

use strict;
use warnings;

my $name;

assign_name();
print_name();

sub assign_name {
    $name = "alice";
}

sub print_name {
    print $name;
}

(There's no reason to use our here!)

share|improve this answer
    
Could you please elaborate on where I should use our then? –  user1032613 Sep 28 '12 at 17:16
4  
You mean "when"? When you want to create a global variable, i.e. almost never; you always want to limit the scope of variables as much as possible. When you need to populate your package's @ISA for Perl for your packages @EXPORT_OK for Exporter is about the only two times. –  ikegami Sep 28 '12 at 17:20
    
I would add, you use a global variable (i.e. our) when you want the variable to be accessible from some other package. Nearly every time you might want think to do this, you would be better served rewriting the library using an OO scheme. (The reason @EXPORT_OK is global is because the Exporter module inspects it to determine which symbols to export, therefore the variable must be visible outside the package.) –  Joel Berger Sep 28 '12 at 22:05
1  
@Joel Berger, my thoughts exactly –  ikegami Sep 28 '12 at 22:32
1  
@memowe, Not true. our variables are lexically scoped variables that are aliased to package variables. They are most definitely variables (an association between a name and storage). –  ikegami Sep 30 '12 at 2:45

I know this is beyond the scope of your question, and ikegami's answer answers it nicely, still I think there is more to be said. If you have functions that are mean to change package-scoped variables, likely you could do better rewriting those variables as object attributes. In Perl we can do that using Moose.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

{ # proper use of scoping, h/t tchrist

  package Person;

  use Moose;
  use namespace::autoclean; # recommended

  has 'name' => ( is => 'rw', isa => 'Str', required => 1);

  __PACKAGE__->meta->make_immutable; # recommended

}

my $person = Person->new( name => 'Joel' );
$person->name( 'Adam' ); # change name

print $person->name . "\n";

In this example we make a name attribute, we can set it during object construction, then change it or view it using accessor methods. The data that would have been global, in this case the name, is then contained inside the object's internal data. This allows different parts of your code to reuse that same logic without worrying about the state of that global data.

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1  
Thank you very much for your kind answer. –  user1032613 Sep 28 '12 at 22:43

You should declare the global variable upper :

use strict;
use warnings;

my $name;

assign_name();
print_name();

sub assign_name {
    $name = "alice";
}

sub print_name {
    print $name;   # This is line 12.
}
share|improve this answer
    
While this works, as ikegami points out, you really don't need to make $name global here. –  Joel Berger Sep 28 '12 at 22:05
    
Yup, post edited. –  sputnick Sep 29 '12 at 14:47

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