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In the following Java snippet, the scope of i is limited to the inside of the for loop. That's why it causes an error. However, in the similar JS snippet, the i is apparently accessible outside of the loop. How is that possible?

Java:

for(int i=0;i<10;i++) {
    ...
}
System.out.println(i);

Output: "i is not defined"

JS:

for(var i=0;i<10;i++) { 
    ...
}
console.log(i);

Output: 10

I didn't expect to see output from the JS. I want to know how JS differs from Java. How does JavaScript variable scope work?

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closed as not a real question by Nambari, Jon Skeet, Xaerxess, cadrell0, Jocelyn Sep 28 '12 at 20:56

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Java is NOT Javascript. –  Nambari Sep 28 '12 at 18:02
2  
And what is your question? –  Christian Sep 28 '12 at 18:03
    
Did you mean to have the semicolon at the end of the for? –  Louis Wasserman Sep 28 '12 at 18:04
1  
I think he did, otherwise the result of the first loop would be ten prints and not "i is not defined". –  Gamb Sep 28 '12 at 18:05
    
@LouisWasserman yes, he meant to leave the semicolon there. The fact you had to check is why doing so is never good practise. –  Alnitak Sep 28 '12 at 18:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

In Javascript "local" variables have function scope, not block scope.

All local variable declarations are "hoisted" to the top of the current scope, so your code is equivalent to:

var i;
for (i = 0; i < 10; ++i) {
}
console.log(i);

Note that while the declaration is hoisted, any assignment is not. e.g. this code

function test() {
    console.log(i);  // undefined
    var i = 1;       // declaration and assignment
    console.log(i);  // 1
}

is equivalent to:

function test() {
    var i;           // declaration hoisted
    console.log(i);  // undefined
    i = 1;           // assignment still happens here
    console.log(i);  // 1
}
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I'd just like to add that, since all variable declarations will be hoisted to the top of the function they appear in, many (myself included) consider it best practice to reflect that in the code by declaring all variables at the start of the function, even if they are only used in one block. This prevents confusion and also makes it easier to sort out closures. –  jrajav Sep 28 '12 at 18:10
1  
@Kiyura actually, I don't adhere to that view, I prefer to declare (and assign to) variables closer to their point of use. –  Alnitak Sep 28 '12 at 18:12

Javascript only has two types of scoping - global and functional. Javascript is lexically scoped at the function-level.

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