Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

In a project using scipy and numpy, should I use scipy.pi, numpy.pi, or math.pi?

Ten minutes on google and Stack Overflow doesn't give an answer.

share|improve this question
2  
No, the fact that all these modules provide the constant tells me that there's some reason for that? – Douglas B. Staple Sep 28 '12 at 18:39
1  
It's because you don't always use all of them, and you'd not want to install and import a module just to get Pi. – Lev Levitsky Sep 28 '12 at 18:40
1  
@DouglasB.Staple: The only reason is so if you are using just one of the three modules, you can conveniently have access to pi without having to import another module. They're not providing different values for pi. – BrenBarn Sep 28 '12 at 18:41
1  
@BrenBarn OK Thanks. Please add that to your answer below; I'll accept when the minimum time elapses. – Douglas B. Staple Sep 28 '12 at 18:44
5  
@LevLevitsky I just started using python and I noticed that there's a difference between math.exp and numpy.exp (numpy.exp can take a list but math.exp wants a float). So I didn't think it was a dumb question... – Douglas B. Staple Sep 28 '12 at 18:49
up vote 65 down vote accepted
>>> import math
>>> import numpy as np
>>> import scipy
>>> math.pi == np.pi == scipy.pi
True

So it doesn't matter, they are all the same value.

The only reason all three modules provide a pi value is so if you are using just one of the three modules, you can conveniently have access to pi without having to import another module. They're not providing different values for pi.

share|improve this answer
6  
All other things being equal, I would use math.pi simply because it is in the standard library if the module doesn't depend on numpy or scipy otherwise -- But as you say, use pi in whichever module you're importing to begin with because they're all the same value. – mgilson Sep 28 '12 at 18:46

One thing to note is that not all libraries will use the same meaning for pi, of course, so it never hurts to know what you're using. For example, the symbolic math library Sympy's representation of pi is not the same as math and numpy:

import math
import numpy
import scipy
import sympy

print(math.pi == numpy.pi)
> True
print(math.pi == scipy.pi)
> True
print(math.pi == sympy.pi)
> False
share|improve this answer
1  
Why is SymPy supposed to have different value?!... – Roboticist May 20 '15 at 19:07
1  
sympy Pi isn't stored as a constant/float, it's an object that contains the constant – Naib Jun 15 '15 at 8:53
    
Neat. While this answer looks like a rehash of the popular one, it actually brings something that I was looking for to the table. Thanks for including sympy. – Mad Physicist Jan 26 at 23:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.