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Reference: SQL Server

I have a stored procedure with a while loop in it and I want some messages to be printed after every 500 loops.

So, I've written -

CREATE spxxx
AS
BEGIN
    BEGIN TRAN
        DECLARE @counter = 0;

        WHILE <somecondition>
            SET @counter = @counter + 1;

            IF @counter % 50 = 0
            BEGIN
                PRINT @counter;
            END
        END
     COMMIT TRAN
END -- End spxxx

But it prints all the messages once the proc ends. I want it to print the messages while its running.

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sorry that was a type, i need the message every 50 loops. –  Binder Aug 12 '09 at 7:28
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3 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

I'm sure you can use RAISERROR ... WITH NOWAIT

If you use severity 10 it's not an error. This also provides some handy formatting eg %s, %i and you can use state too to track where you are.

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HI, thanks but i tried RAISERROR(@msg, 10, 1) with nowait; and it still doesn't print anything :( –  Binder Aug 12 '09 at 7:22
2  
Try the following code: DECLARE @counter INT SET @counter = 0; DECLARE @msg VARCHAR(4) WHILE @counter < 1000 BEGIN SET @counter = @counter + 1; IF @counter % 50 = 0 BEGIN SET @msg = CAST(@counter AS VARCHAR(4)) RAISERROR (@msg, 10, 0 ) WITH NOWAIT WAITFOR DELAY '00:00:01' END END –  Tragedian Aug 12 '09 at 7:28
2  
nopes. still not working ! –  Binder Aug 12 '09 at 7:31
    
Where are you running the code from? In SQL Management Studio, I can run this code and view the output as it is generated in the "Messages" tab of the query window. –  Tragedian Aug 12 '09 at 7:36
    
SSMS 2008, thanks dude, its working for me also now. –  Binder Aug 12 '09 at 8:00
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Can I just ask about the long term need for this facility - is it for debuging purposes?

If so, then you may want to consider using a proper debugger, such as the one found in Visual Studio, as this allows you to step through the procedure in a more controlled way, and avoids having to constantly add/remove PRINT statement from the procedure.

Just my opinion, but I prefer the debugger approach - for code and databases.

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1  
No long term need, I was just writing a data migration SP and wanted to see some results in the loop. –  Binder Aug 13 '09 at 12:00
    
I found it useful for diagnosing performance problems by adding timings at various places. If done using a debugger the debugging process may affect the SP being measured. –  Martin Capodici Jan 15 at 21:06
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SQL Server returns messages after a batch of statements has been executed. Normally, you'd use SQL GO to indicate the end of a batch and to retrieve the results:

PRINT '1'
GO

WAITFOR DELAY '00:00:05'

PRINT '2'
GO

WAITFOR DELAY '00:00:05'

PRINT '3'
GO

In this case, however, the print statement you want returned immediately is in the middle of a loop, so the print statements cannot be in their own batch. The only command I know of that will return in the middle of a batch is RAISERROR (...) WITH NOWAIT, which gbn has provided as an answer as I type this.

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:This is not working inside the SP but it is obvious inside Query Window.Is it?? –  kta Sep 30 '11 at 12:02
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