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I have a method where I create objects on the heap and return a boolean which indicates if it went well or not. I am not 100% sure about my bool assignments though in (1); is this legal to do?

    bool ret = true;

    if (ret = !mRenderBackend)     // make sure mRenderBackend is NULL
    {
        if (mEngineSettings.GetRenderBackend() == OPENGL)
            ret = mRenderBackend = mMemoryAllocator.AllocateObject<RenderOpenGL>();    // (1). AllocateObject returns either NULL or object address
        }

    return ret;

Thanks

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Even if this works, you are obscuring the logic. Test for NULL (or nullptr in newer c++). – crashmstr Sep 28 '12 at 19:35
    
If you don't want warnings on some compilers, use if ((ret = !mRenderBackend)) – Dani Sep 28 '12 at 19:36
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You don't really need the bool at all, it sort of makes it harder to follow. I would personally do something like,

if (mRenderBackend == NULL)     // make sure mRenderBackend is NULL
{
    if (mEngineSettings.GetRenderBackend() == OPENGL)
        mRenderBackend = mMemoryAllocator.AllocateObject<RenderOpenGL>();    // (1). AllocateObject returns either NULL or object address
    }

return (mRenderBackend != NULL);
share|improve this answer
    
Agreed, thanks for answer – KaiserJohaan Sep 28 '12 at 21:23

Yes, legal.

if (ret = !mRenderBackend)  

is equivalent to

ret = !mRenderBackend;
if(ret)

is equivalent to

ret = (mRenderBackend == 0);
if(ret)

Just note that ret will only be defined up to zero/nonzeroness which looks safe in your code.

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