Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to program a genetic algorithm for a project and am having difficulty keeping different functions separate. I've been reading up on policy-based design, and this seems like a solution to the problem, but I don't really understand how to implement it.

I've got an OptimizerHost, which inherits from a SelectionPolicy (to determine what solutions are evaluated) and a FitnessPolicy (to determine the fitness of any given solution). The problem is I can't figure out how the two policies can communicate with one another. The bulk of the algorithm is implemented in the SelectionPolicy, but it still needs to be able to check the fitness of its solutions. The only thing I can think of is to implement the SelectionPolicy algorithm in the OptimizerHost itself, so then it will inherit the things it needs from the FitnessPolicy. But that seems like its missing the point of using policies in the first place. Am I misunderstanding something?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

I'm not very familiar with the Policy-Based design principles (sorry) but when I read your problem, I felt like you need something like pure virtual classes (as interfaces) to help you through it.

The thing is, you cannot use something from the other, if it's not previously declared: this is the basic rule. Thus, you need to use and virtual interface to say SelectPolicy that FitnessPolicy has some members to be used. Please follow the example, and change it accordingly to your algortihms-needs.

First: create the interfaces for the SelectionPolicy and the FitnessPolicy

template <class T> class FitnessPolicyBase
{
  public:

    virtual int Fitness(T fitnessSet); // assuming you have implemented the required classes etc. here - return value can be different of course

  ...
} // write your other FitnessPolicy stuff here

template <class T> class SelectionPolicyBase
{
  public:

   virtual T Selector(FitnessPolicyBase<Solution> evaluator, Set<T> selectionSet); // assuming such a set exists here

   ...  
} // write your other selectionpolicy interface here

Now, since we made these classes pure virtual (they have nothing but virtual functions) we cannot use them but only inherit from them. This is precisely what we'll do: The SelectionPolicy class and the FitnessPolicy class will be inheriting from them, respectively:

class SelectionPolicy: public SelectionPolicyBase<Solution> // say, our solutions are of Solution Type...
{
  public:
    virtual Solution Selector(FitnessPolicyBase<Solution> evaluator, Set<Solution> selectionSet);   // return your selected item in this function

  ...
}

class FitnessPolicy : public FitnessPolicy Base<Solution> // say, our solutions are of SolutionSet Type...
{
  public:
    virtual int Fitness(Solution set);   // return the fitness score here

  ...
}

Now, our algortihm can run with two types of parameters: SolutionSetBase and FitnessSetBase. Did we really need the xxxBase types at all? Not actually, as long as we have the public interfaces of the SolutionPolicy and FitnessPolicy classes, we could use them; but using this way, we kinda seperated the `logic' from the problem.

Now, our Selection Policy algorithm can take references to the policy classes and then call the required function. Note here that, policy classes can call each others' classes as well. So this is a valid situation now:

virtual Solution SelectionPolicy::Selector(FitnessPolicyBase<Solution> evaluator, Set<T> selectionSet)
{
  int score = evaluator.Fitness(selectionSet[0]); //assuming an array type indexing here. Change accordingly to your implementation and comparisons etc. 
}

Now, in order for this to work, though, you must have initialized a FitnessPolicy object and pass it to this Selector. Due to upcasting and virtual functions, it will work properly.

Please forgive me if I've been overcomplicating things - I've been kinda afar from C++ lately (working on C# recently) thus might have mistaken the syntax an stuff, but logic should be the same anyway.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.